Roaringly

roaring

[rawr-ing, rohr-]
noun
1.
the act of a person, animal, or thing that roars.
2.
a loud, deep cry or sound or a series of such sounds.
3.
Veterinary Pathology. a disease of horses, caused by respiratory obstruction or vocal cord paralysis, and characterized by loud or rough breathing sounds.
adjective
4.
making or causing a roar, as an animal or thunder.
5.
brisk or highly successful, as trade: He did a roaring business selling watches to tourists.
6.
characterized by noisy, disorderly behavior; boisterous; riotous: roaring revelry.
7.
complete; utter; out-and-out: a roaring idiot; a roaring success.
adverb
8.
very; extremely: roaring drunk.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English roryng (noun, adj.), Old English rarung (noun). See roar, -ing1, -ing2

roaringly, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
roaring (ˈrɔːrɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  informal very brisk and profitable (esp in the phrase a roaring trade)
2.  (Austral) the roaring days the period of the Australian goldrushes
3.  derogatory, informal (Irish) (intensifier): a roaring communist
 
adv
4.  noisily or boisterously (esp in the phrase roaring drunk)
 
n
5.  a loud prolonged cry
6.  Compare whistling a debilitating breathing defect of horses characterized by rasping sounds with each breath: caused by inflammation of the respiratory tract or obstruction of the larynx
 
'roaringly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

roar
O.E. rarian, probably of imitative origin (cf. M.Du. reeren, Ger. röhren "to roar;" Skt. ragati "barks;" Lith. reju "to scold;" O.C.S. revo "I roar;" L. raucus "hoarse"). The noun is attested from late 14c. Roaring forties in reference to exceptional rough seas between latitudes 40 and 50 south,
is attested from 1867.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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