Rogation Days

rogation

[roh-gey-shuhn]
noun
1.
Usually, rogations. Ecclesiastical. solemn supplication, especially as chanted during procession on the three days (Rogation Days) before Ascension Day.
2.
Roman History.
a.
the proposing by the consuls or tribunes of a law to be passed by the people.
b.
a law so proposed.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English rogacio(u)n < Latin rogātiōn- (stem of rogātiō), equivalent to rogāt(us) (past participle of rogāre to ask, beg) + -iōn- -ion

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World English Dictionary
rogation (rəʊˈɡeɪʃən)
 
n
(usually plural) Christianity a solemn supplication, esp in a form of ceremony prescribed by the Church
 
[C14: from Latin rogātiō, from rogāre to ask, make supplication]

Rogation Days
 
pl n
April 25 (the Major Rogation) and the Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday before Ascension Day, observed by Christians as days of solemn supplication for the harvest and marked by processions, special prayers, and blessing of the crops

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rogation
late 14c., from L. rogatio (gen. rogationis), from rogatus, pp. of rogare "to ask," apparently an image, lit. "to stretch out (the hand)," from PIE *rog-, 0-grade form of root *reg- "move in a straight line" (see regal). Rogation days were the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
before Ascension Day, a time for processions round fields blessing crops and praying for good harvest, also blessing the boundary markers of each parish. Discouraged by Protestants as superstitious, but continued or revived in modified form as beating the bounds.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

rogation days

in the Roman Catholic church, festivals devoted to special prayers for the crops; they comprise the Major Rogation (Major Litany) on April 25 and the Minor Rogations (Minor Litany) on the three days before Ascension Day (40th day after Easter). The Major Rogation originated as a Christian festival to supplant a pagan Roman festival, Robigalia, which consisted of a procession from Rome to a point outside the city, where a dog and a sheep were sacrificed to save the crops from blight (robigo, "wheat rust"). According to a document of Pope Gregory I, the Christian festival was established as an annual event by the year 598. The Christian procession followed the same route as the pagan procession for a certain distance and then turned off and returned to St. Peter's Basilica, where mass was celebrated.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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