sabotage

[sab-uh-tahzh, sab-uh-tahzh]
noun
1.
any underhand interference with production, work, etc., in a plant, factory, etc., as by enemy agents during wartime or by employees during a trade dispute.
2.
any undermining of a cause.
verb (used with object), sabotaged, sabotaging.
3.
to injure or attack by sabotage.

Origin:
1865–70; < French, equivalent to sabot(er) to botch, orig., to strike, shake up, harry, derivative of sabot sabot + -age -age

unsabotaged, adjective


3. disable, vandalize, cripple.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
sabotage (ˈsæbəˌtɑːʒ)
 
n
1.  the deliberate destruction, disruption, or damage of equipment, a public service, etc, as by enemy agents, dissatisfied employees, etc
2.  any similar action or behaviour
 
vb
3.  (tr) to destroy, damage, or disrupt, esp by secret means
 
[C20: from French, from saboter to spoil through clumsiness (literally: to clatter in sabots)]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sabotage
1910, from Fr. sabotage, from saboter "to sabotage, bungle," lit. "walk noisily," from sabot "wooden shoe" (13c.), altered (by association with O.Fr. bot "boot") from M.Fr. savate "old shoe," from an unidentified source that also produced similar words in O.Prov., Port., Sp., It., Arabic and Basque.
In Fr., the sense of "deliberately and maliciously destroying property" originally was in ref. to labor disputes, but the oft-repeated story that the modern meaning derives from strikers' supposed tactic of throwing old shoes into machinery is not supported by the etymology. Likely it was not meant as a literal image; the word was used in Fr. in a variety of "bungling" senses, such as "to play a piece of music badly." The verb is first attested 1918 in Eng., from the noun. Saboteur is 1921, a borrowing from Fr.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Of course, mere facts will not stop people from writing in and claiming
  streetcar lines were sabotaged for the sake of cars.
Staff covered for each other, grievance processes were sabotaged and evidence
  was frequently destroyed.
Put sabotaged circuits firmly in the second category.
They have sabotaged the northern oil pipeline on which much of the country's
  oil revenue depends.
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