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sagacity

[suh-gas-i-tee] /səˈgæs ɪ ti/
noun
1.
acuteness of mental discernment and soundness of judgment.
Origin
1540-1550
1540-50; < Latin sagācitās wisdom, equivalent to sagāci- (stem of sagāx) wise (akin to seek) + -tās -ty2
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for sagacity
  • Never did human sagacity utter a more pregnant truth.
  • Fear is an instructor of great sagacity and the herald of all revolutions.
  • The latter is the sagacity to combine all these purposes for his own lasting benefit.
  • To this point therefore tend the observations which he has collected with great sagacity and industry.
  • But after the first year, popularity took second place to efficiency and sagacity.
  • Even the drained, drowsy, dead beat mind has the sagacity to know that there is something special about this day.
  • The shafts of those he asked were feathered with courtesy and kindness, but pointed with sagacity.
  • His investments in this country directed many others to our public domain who had great confidence in his sagacity.
  • They displayed surprising business sagacity, coupled with an exalted idea of the fulfillment of promises.
  • Its leaders have demonstrated their political sagacity.
British Dictionary definitions for sagacity

sagacity

/səˈɡæsɪtɪ/
noun
1.
foresight, discernment, or keen perception; ability to make good judgments
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sagacity
n.

c.1500, from Middle French sagacité, from Latin sagacitatem (nominative sagacitas) "keenness of perception, quality of being acute," from sagax (genitive sagacis) "of quick perception, acute," related to sagus "prophetic," sagire "perceive keenly," from PIE root *sag- "to track down, trace, seek" (cf. Old English secan "to seek;" see seek). Also used 17c.-18c. of animals, meaning "acute sense of smell."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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