salient

[sey-lee-uhnt, seyl-yuhnt]
adjective
1.
prominent or conspicuous: salient traits.
2.
projecting or pointing outward: a salient angle.
3.
leaping or jumping: a salient animal.
4.
Heraldry. (of a beast) represented as leaping: a lion salient.
noun
5.
a salient angle or part, as the central outward-projecting angle of a bastion or an outward projection in a battle line.
6.
Physical Geography. a landform that extends out beyond its surroundings, as a spur projecting from the side of a mountain. Compare reentrant ( def 4 ).

Origin:
1555–65; < Latin salient- (stem of saliēns, present participle of salīre to spring, jump), equivalent to sali- verb stem + -ent- -ent

saliently, adverb
unsalient, adjective
unsaliently, adverb


1. important; striking, remarkable.


1. inconspicuous, unimportant.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
salient (ˈseɪlɪənt)
 
adj
1.  prominent, conspicuous, or striking: a salient feature
2.  Compare re-entrant (esp in fortifications) projecting outwards at an angle of less than 180°
3.  geometry Compare re-entrant (of an angle) pointing outwards from a polygon and hence less than 180°
4.  (esp of animals) leaping
 
n
5.  military a projection of the forward line into enemy-held territory
6.  a salient angle
 
[C16: from Latin salīre to leap]
 
'salience
 
n
 
'saliency
 
n
 
'saliently
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

salient
1562, "leaping," a heraldic term, from L. salientem (nom. saliens), prp. of salire "to leap," from PIE base *sel- "to jump" (cf. Gk. hallesthai "to leap," M.Ir. saltraim "I trample," and probably Skt. ucchalati "rises quickly"). The meaning "pointing outward" (preserved in military usage) is from 1687;
that of "prominent, striking" first recorded 1840, from salient point (1672), which refers to the heart of an embryo, which seems to leap, and translates L. punctum saliens, going back to Aristotle's writings. Hence, the "starting point" of anything.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Gather necessary information and salient facts before making an important
  decision.
The salient quality of them all is their sincerity and directness.
It's a salient feature of modern media that being thought to be popular can
  make you more popular.
Here is my take on several of their more salient observations.
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