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salutation

[sal-yuh-tey-shuh n] /ˌsæl yəˈteɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of saluting.
2.
something uttered, written, or done by way of saluting.
3.
a word or phrase serving as the prefatory greeting in a letter or speech, as Dear Sir in a letter or Ladies and Gentlemen in a speech.
Origin of salutation
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English < Latin salūtātiōn- (stem of salūtātiō) greeting, equivalent to salūtāt(us) (past participle of salūtāre to greet; see salute, -ate1) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
salutational, adjective
salutationless, adjective
nonsalutation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for salutation
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Arm in arm with Brunson, the don would give him that salutation.

    A Country Gentleman and his Family Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant
  • She answered his salutation with a frank inclination of the head.

    Casanova's Homecoming Arthur Schnitzler
  • The elder brother rose from his chair as they entered, although his salutation was even grimmer than his first welcome.

    The Hillman E. Phillips Oppenheim
  • "We shut the door when the steed's stolen, Mr. Arthur," was his salutation.

    The Channings Mrs. Henry Wood
  • All this honour ostensibly shown to Petrarch was really the salutation to the new dawn.

    A Short History of Italy Henry Dwight Sedgwick
  • After hailing the morn with this second salutation, he threw a boot at the woman as a third.

    A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens
  • "This has been a distressing affair," said Lady Lufton after her first salutation.

    Framley Parsonage Anthony Trollope
British Dictionary definitions for salutation

salutation

/ˌsæljʊˈteɪʃən/
noun
1.
an act, phrase, gesture, etc, that serves as a greeting
2.
a form of words used as an opening to a speech or letter, such as Dear Sir or Ladies and Gentlemen
3.
the act of saluting
Word Origin
C14: from Latin salūtātiō, from salūtāre to greet; see salute
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for salutation
n.

late 14c., from Old French salutacion "greeting," from Latin salutationem (nominative salutatio) "a greeting, saluting," noun of action from past participle stem of salutare "to greet" (see salute (v.)). As a word of greeting (elliptical for "I offer salutation") it is recorded from 1530s. Related: Salutations.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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salutation in the Bible

"Eastern modes of salutation are not unfrequently so prolonged as to become wearisome and a positive waste of time. The profusely polite Arab asks so many questions after your health, your happiness, your welfare, your house, and other things, that a person ignorant of the habits of the country would imagine there must be some secret ailment or mysterious sorrow oppressing you, which you wished to conceal, so as to spare the feelings of a dear, sympathizing friend, but which he, in the depth of his anxiety, would desire to hear of. I have often listened to these prolonged salutations in the house, the street, and the highway, and not unfrequently I have experienced their tedious monotony, and I have bitterly lamented useless waste of time" (Porter, Through Samaria, etc.). The work on which the disciples were sent forth was one of urgency, which left no time for empty compliments and prolonged greetings (Luke 10:4).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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10
13
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