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sanctify

[sangk-tuh-fahy] /ˈsæŋk təˌfaɪ/
verb (used with object), sanctified, sanctifying.
1.
to make holy; set apart as sacred; consecrate.
2.
to purify or free from sin:
Sanctify your hearts.
3.
to impart religious sanction to; render legitimate or binding:
to sanctify a vow.
4.
to entitle to reverence or respect.
5.
to make productive of or conducive to spiritual blessing.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; < Late Latin sānctificāre (see Sanctus, -ify); replacing Middle English seintefien < Old French saintifier < Latin, as above
Related forms
sanctifiable, adjective
sanctifiableness, noun
sanctifiably, adverb
sanctification, noun
sanctifier, noun
sanctifyingly, adverb
nonsanctification, noun
presanctify, verb (used with object), presanctified, presanctifying.
self-sanctification, noun
unsanctifying, adjective
Synonyms
1. bless, hallow, anoint, enshrine, exalt.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for sanctification
  • Sales figures confirmed the sanctification of true believers.
  • For in short two things are necessary for sanctification- sufferings and joys.
  • Nor, on the other hand, is his film in the business of sanctification.
  • It is the legal recognition, commitment and sanctification of family tradition.
  • Religion and the sanctification of family relationships.
British Dictionary definitions for sanctification

sanctify

/ˈsæŋktɪˌfaɪ/
verb (transitive) -fies, -fying, -fied
1.
to make holy
2.
to free from sin; purify
3.
to sanction (an action or practice) as religiously binding: to sanctify a marriage
4.
to declare or render (something) productive of or conductive to holiness, blessing, or grace
5.
(obsolete) to authorize to be revered
Derived Forms
sanctifiable, adjective
sanctification, noun
sanctifier, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Late Latin sanctificāre, from Latin sanctus holy + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sanctification
n.

1520s, from Church Latin sanctificationem, noun of action from past participle stem of sanctificare (see sanctify).

sanctify

v.

late 14c., seintefie "to consecrate," from Old French saintefier "sanctify" (12c., Modern French sanctifier), from Late Latin sanctificare "to make holy," from sanctus "holy" (see saint (n.)) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Form altered in English c.1400 to conform with Latin. Meaning "to render holy or legitimate by religious sanction" is from c.1400; transferred sense of "to render worthy of respect" is from c.1600. Related: Sanctified; sanctifying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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sanctification in the Bible

involves more than a mere moral reformation of character, brought about by the power of the truth: it is the work of the Holy Spirit bringing the whole nature more and more under the influences of the new gracious principles implanted in the soul in regeneration. In other words, sanctification is the carrying on to perfection the work begun in regeneration, and it extends to the whole man (Rom. 6:13; 2 Cor. 4:6; Col. 3:10; 1 John 4:7; 1 Cor. 6:19). It is the special office of the Holy Spirit in the plan of redemption to carry on this work (1 Cor. 6:11; 2 Thess. 2:13). Faith is instrumental in securing sanctification, inasmuch as it (1) secures union to Christ (Gal. 2:20), and (2) brings the believer into living contact with the truth, whereby he is led to yield obedience "to the commands, trembling at the threatenings, and embracing the promises of God for this life and that which is to come." Perfect sanctification is not attainable in this life (1 Kings 8:46; Prov. 20:9; Eccl. 7:20; James 3:2; 1 John 1:8). See Paul's account of himself in Rom. 7:14-25; Phil. 3:12-14; and 1 Tim. 1:15; also the confessions of David (Ps. 19:12, 13; 51), of Moses (90:8), of Job (42:5, 6), and of Daniel (9:3-20). "The more holy a man is, the more humble, self-renouncing, self-abhorring, and the more sensitive to every sin he becomes, and the more closely he clings to Christ. The moral imperfections which cling to him he feels to be sins, which he laments and strives to overcome. Believers find that their life is a constant warfare, and they need to take the kingdom of heaven by storm, and watch while they pray. They are always subject to the constant chastisement of their Father's loving hand, which can only be designed to correct their imperfections and to confirm their graces. And it has been notoriously the fact that the best Christians have been those who have been the least prone to claim the attainment of perfection for themselves.", Hodge's Outlines.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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