sand-bagger

sandbag

[sand-bag]
noun
1.
a bag filled with sand, used in fortification, as ballast, etc.
2.
such a bag used as a weapon.
verb (used with object), sandbagged, sandbagging.
3.
to furnish with sandbags.
4.
to hit or stun with a sandbag.
5.
Informal.
a.
to set upon violently; attack from or as if from ambush.
b.
to coerce or intimidate, as by threats: The election committee was sandbagged into nominating the officers for a second term.
c.
to thwart or cause to fail or be rejected, especially surreptitiously or without warning: He sandbagged our proposal by snide remarks to the boss.
6.
Poker. to deceive (one or more opponents) into remaining in the pot by refraining from betting on a strong hand, then raising the bet in a later round.
verb (used without object), sandbagged, sandbagging.
7.
Poker. to sandbag one or more opponents.

Origin:
1580–90; sand + bag

sandbagger, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
sandbag (ˈsændˌbæɡ)
 
n
1.  a sack filled with sand used for protection against gunfire, floodwater, etc, or as ballast in a balloon, ship, etc
2.  a bag filled with sand and used as a weapon
 
vb , -bags, -bagging, -bagged
3.  to protect or strengthen with sandbags
4.  to hit with or as if with a sandbag
5.  finance to obstruct (an unwelcome takeover bid) by prolonging talks in the hope that an acceptable bidder will come forward
 
'sandbagger
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sandbag
1590, from sand + bag. The verb sense of "pretend weakness" is 1970s, extended from poker-playing sense of "refrain from raising at the first opportunity in hopes of raising more steeply later" (1940), which perhaps is from sandbagger in the sense of "bully or ruffian who uses a sandbag as a weapon to
knock his intended victim unconscious" (1882).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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