savingly

saving

[sey-ving]
adjective
1.
tending or serving to save; rescuing; preserving.
2.
compensating; redeeming: a saving sense of humor.
3.
thrifty; economical: a saving housekeeper.
4.
making a reservation: a saving clause.
noun
5.
a reduction or lessening of expenditure or outlay: a saving of 10 percent.
6.
something that is saved.
7.
savings, sums of money saved by economy and laid away.
8.
Law. a reservation or exception.
preposition
9.
except: Nothing remains saving these ruins.
10.
with all due respect to or for: saving your presence.
conjunction
11.
except; save.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English; see save1, -ing2, -ing1

savingly, adverb
nonsaving, adjective
unsaving, adjective
unsavingly, adverb


2. restoring, redemptory, qualifying.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
saving (ˈseɪvɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  tending to save or preserve
2.  redeeming or compensating (esp in the phrase saving grace)
3.  thrifty or economical
4.  law denoting or relating to an exception or reservation: a saving clause in an agreement
 
n
5.  preservation or redemption, esp from loss or danger
6.  economy or avoidance of waste
7.  reduction in cost or expenditure: a saving of 100 dollars
8.  anything saved
9.  (plural) money saved for future use
10.  law an exception or reservation
 
prep
11.  with the exception of
 
conj
12.  except
 
'savingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

save
early 13c., "to deliver (one's soul) from sin and its consequences;" mid-13c., "to deliver or rescue from peril," from O.Fr. sauver, from L.L. salvare "make safe, secure," from L. salvus "safe" (see safe (adj.)). Meaning "store up, to keep instead of spending" is attested from
mid-14c.; savings "money hoarded up" is from 1737; savings bank is 1817 (S & L for savings and loan attested from 1951). Save face (1898) first was used among the British community in China and is said to be from Chinese; it has not been found in Chinese, but tiu lien "to lose face" does occur. To not (do something) to save one's life is recorded from 1848. Phrase saved by the bell (1932) is from boxing.

save
in the sports sense of "act of preventing opponent from scoring," 1890, from save (v.).

save
c.1300, from safe (q.v.), paralleling evolution in O.Fr. sauf "safe," prepositional use of the adj., in phrases such as saulve l'honneur "save (our) honor."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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