saying

[sey-ing]
noun
1.
something said, especially a proverb or apothegm.
Idioms
2.
go without saying, to be completely self-evident; be understood: It goes without saying that you are welcome to visit us at any time.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English (gerund); see say1, -ing1


1. maxim, adage, saw, aphorism.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
saying (ˈseɪɪŋ)
 
n
a maxim, adage, or proverb

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

saying
"utterance, recitation, act of the verb 'say,' " c.1300, prp. of say (v.); meaning "something that has been said" (usually by someone thought important) is from c.1300; sense of "a proverb" is first attested mid-15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The history of this collection of sayings is rather interesting as well as
  surprising.
The low-bandwidth version includes all of the sayings in the high-bandwidth
  version.
Each headstone is different, and many have sayings inscribed on them.
Anybody who has ever looked at a collection of these sayings must have been
  impressed by their variety.
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