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scarab

[skar-uh b] /ˈskær əb/
noun
1.
any scarabaeid beetle, especially Scarabaeus sacer, regarded as sacred by the ancient Egyptians.
2.
a representation or image of a beetle, much used among the ancient Egyptians as a symbol, seal, amulet, or the like.
3.
a gem cut to resemble a beetle.
Also, scarabaeus (for defs 2, 3).
Origin
1570-1580
1570-80; short for scarabaeus
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for scarabs
  • Manticores small creatures that look like scarabs when folded up.
British Dictionary definitions for scarabs

scarab

/ˈskærəb/
noun
1.
any scarabaeid beetle, esp Scarabaeus sacer (sacred scarab), regarded by the ancient Egyptians as divine
2.
the scarab as represented on amulets, etc, of ancient Egypt, or in hieroglyphics as a symbol of the solar deity
Word Origin
C16: from Latin scarabaeus; probably related to Greek karabos horned beetle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for scarabs

scarab

n.

"black dung beetle," held sacred by the ancient Egyptians, 1570s, from Middle French scarabeé, from Latin scarabaeus, name of a type of beetle, from Greek karabos "beetle, crayfish," a foreign word, according to Klein probably Macedonian (the suffix -bos is non-Greek). Related: Scarabaean. In ancient use, also a gem cut in a shape like a scarab beetle and with an inscription on the underside.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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