scarecrowy

scarecrow

[skair-kroh]
noun
1.
an object, usually a figure of a person in old clothes, set up to frighten crows or other birds away from crops.
2.
anything frightening but not really dangerous.
3.
a person in ragged clothes.
4.
an extremely thin person.

Origin:
1545–55; scare + crow1

scarecrowish, scarecrowy, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To scarecrowy
Collins
World English Dictionary
scarecrow (ˈskɛəˌkrəʊ)
 
n
1.  an object, usually in the shape of a man, made out of sticks and old clothes to scare birds away from crops
2.  a person or thing that appears frightening but is not actually harmful
3.  informal
 a.  an untidy-looking person
 b.  a very thin person

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scarecrow
1550s, from scare + crow. Earliest reference is to a person employed to scare birds. Stick-figure sense is implied by 1580s
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature