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scare

[skair] /skɛər/
verb (used with object), scared, scaring.
1.
to fill, especially suddenly, with fear or terror; frighten; alarm.
verb (used without object), scared, scaring.
2.
to become frightened:
That horse scares easily.
noun
3.
a sudden fright or alarm, especially with little or no reason.
4.
a time or condition of alarm or worry:
For three months there was a war scare.
Verb phrases
5.
scare up, Informal. to obtain with effort; find or gather:
to scare up money.
Origin
late Middle English
1150-1200
1150-1200; (v.) Middle English skerren < Old Norse skirra to frighten, derivative of skjarr timid, shy; (noun) late Middle English skere, derivative of the v.
Related forms
scarer, noun
scaringly, adverb
unscared, adjective
Synonyms
1. startle, intimidate. See frighten.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for scares
  • Since the dog scares away the cheetahs, the farmers don't shoot them.
  • The battery-operated device sends out a pinging noise that scares the dolphins off.
  • He doesn't show his teeth and the growling is kind of muffled, but it scares us none the less.
  • scares are not its strong suit, but it has a trim, bright look and better performances than might be expected.
  • Not a bad little time-waster, this film relies more on nudity than scares, with a dollop of gore for good measure.
  • And if the threat of losing a limb to a hungry fish scares him, or if he is worried about the nasty weather, he doesn't show it.
  • The scares were earned honestly, and the performances were amazing.
  • During past recession scares any shortfall in income from jobs and investments could be bridged by a bank overdraft or loan.
  • Pandemic influenza scares provided another boost to the business.
  • There is, of course, the kind of violent crime that scares or irritates people and the kind that leaves them dead.
British Dictionary definitions for scares

scare

/skɛə/
verb
1.
to fill or be filled with fear or alarm
2.
(transitive; often foll by away or off) to drive (away) by frightening
3.
(transitive) (US & Canadian, informal) (foll by up)
  1. to produce (a meal) quickly from whatever is available
  2. to manage to find (something) quickly or with difficulty: brewers need to scare up more sales
noun
4.
a sudden attack of fear or alarm
5.
a period of general fear or alarm
adjective
6.
causing (needless) fear or alarm: a scare story
Derived Forms
scarer, noun
Word Origin
C12: from Old Norse skirra; related to Norwegian skjerra, Swedish dialect skjarra
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for scares

scare

v.

1590s, alteration of Middle English skerren (c.1200), from Old Norse skirra "to frighten; to shrink from, shun; to prevent, avert," related to skjarr "timid, shy, afraid of," of unknown origin. In Scottish also skair, skar, and in dialectal English skeer, skear, which seems to preserve the older pronunciation. To scare up "procure, obtain" is first recorded 1846, American English, from notion of rousing game from cover. Related: Scared; scaring.

n.

"something that frightens; sudden panic, sudden terror inspired by a trifling cause, false alarm," 1520s, alteration of Middle English sker "fear, dread" (c.1400), from scare (v.). Scare tactic attested from 1948.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with scares
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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8
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