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scat1

[skat] /skæt/
verb (used without object), scatted, scatting. Informal.
1.
to go off hastily (often used in the imperative).
Origin
1865-1870
1865-70, Americanism; of uncertain origin

scat2

[skat] /skæt/
verb (used without object), scatted, scatting.
1.
to sing by making full or partial use of the technique of scat singing.
noun
Origin
1925-30; of uncertain origin

scat3

[skat] /skæt/
noun
1.
the excrement of an animal.
Origin
1925-30; origin uncertain; compare British dial. (SW) scat to scatter, fling down, bespatter; Greek skat- (stem of skôr dung; see scato-) is unlikely source, given popular character of the word and unmotivated derivation pattern

scat4

[skat] /skæt/
noun, Slang.
1.
Origin
1945-50; of uncertain origin; compare earlier scat (slang) whiskey

scat5

[skat] /skæt/
noun
1.
(in the Shetland and Orkney Islands) a crown tax, as for use of common lands.
Also, scatt.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English < Old Norse skattr tax, treasure

scat-

1.
variant of scato- before a vowel.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for scat
  • They are hunting not for rare right whales, but for the whale scat.
  • After all, there has to be a population of animals which would be leaving tracks, scat and occasionally bodies.
  • They're also supposed to collect scat samples containing broken seed remnants, to see how well she digests it.
  • Two guides escort up to eight participants-including beginners-into grizzly territory, searching for scat and tracks.
  • And when they first come out of hibernation, they search diligently for moose and deer scat to eat.
  • They're soon swapping fours as they scat, and they've got every bit the chemistry they did on the show.
  • And she also knows, performs and teaches the scat singing styles that developed out of be-bop.
  • The lower end is an aggressive blues bark that delivers scat improvisations in abruptly phrased volleys.
  • Foxes and coyotes eat many mice and voles, so their scat has a lot of hair in it.
  • If you find scat while you're exploring outdoors, use a stick or wear rubber gloves and break it apart.
British Dictionary definitions for scat

scat1

/skæt/
verb scats, scatting, scatted
1.
(intransitive; usually imperative) (informal) to go away in haste
Word Origin
C19: perhaps from a hiss + the word cat, used to frighten away cats

scat2

/skæt/
noun
1.
a type of jazz singing characterized by improvised vocal sounds instead of words
verb scats, scatting, scatted
2.
(intransitive) to sing jazz in this way
Word Origin
C20: perhaps imitative

scat3

/skæt/
noun
1.
any marine and freshwater percoid fish of the Asian family Scatophagidae, esp Scatophagus argus, which has a beautiful coloration
Word Origin
C20: shortened from Scatophagus; see scato-

scat4

/skæt/
noun
1.
an animal dropping
Word Origin
C20: see scato-
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for scat
interj.

"go away!" 1838, from expression quicker than s'cat "in a great hurry," probably representing a hiss followed by the word cat.

n.

"nonsense patter sung to jazz," 1926, probably of imitative origin, from one of the syllables used. As a verb, 1935, from the noun. Related: Scatting.

"filth, dung," 1950, from Greek stem skat- "dung" (see scatology).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for scat

scat 1

modifier

: precise ''scat'' singing

noun

Pattering staccato gibberish sung to songs, esp jazz songs: Then I'd carry on some of my scat

verb

: Scatting has almost always been used by jazz singers as an interlude

[1926+ Jazz musicians; origin unknown; probably one of the nonsense syllables used]


scat 2

verb

To drive or otherwise move very fast

[1950s+ Teenagers; fr early 1800s ss cat, a hissing address designed to drive away a cat; the earliest occurrence is in the expression quicker than ss'cat]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Related Abbreviations for scat

SCAT

  1. School and College Ability Test
  2. special crimes action team
  3. supersonic commercial air transport
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for scat

in biology, any of four species of fishes constituting the family Scatophagidae (order Perciformes). The few species are placed into two genera, Selenotoca and Scatophagus. They are found in marine waters or estuaries of the Indo-Pacific region from the western coast of India to New Guinea and northern Australia and also along the coast of Africa. Occasionally they may enter various freshwater habitats. Scats are known as scavengers, eating decaying plant and animal remains and fecal matter

Learn more about scat with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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6
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