sceptre

[sep-ter]
noun, verb (used with object), sceptred, sceptring. Chiefly British.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sceptre or scepter (ˈsɛptə)
 
n
1.  a ceremonial staff held by a monarch as the symbol of authority
2.  imperial authority; sovereignty
 
vb
3.  (tr) to invest with authority
 
[C13: from Old French sceptre, from Latin scēptrum, from Greek skeptron staff]
 
scepter or scepter
 
n
 
vb
 
[C13: from Old French sceptre, from Latin scēptrum, from Greek skeptron staff]
 
'sceptred or scepter
 
adj
 
'sceptered or scepter
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

SCEPTRE definition


Designing and analysing circuits.
["SCEPTRE: A Computer Program for Circuit and Systems Analysis", J.C. Bowers et al, P-H 1971].

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Sceptre definition


(Heb. shebet = Gr. skeptron), properly a staff or rod. As a symbol of authority, the use of the sceptre originated in the idea that the ruler was as a shepherd of his people (Gen. 49:10; Num. 24:17; Ps. 45:6; Isa. 14:5). There is no example on record of a sceptre having ever been actually handled by a Jewish king.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

sceptre

ornamented rod or staff borne by rulers on ceremonial occasions as an emblem of authority and sovereignty. The primeval symbol of the staff was familiar to the Greeks and Romans and to the Germanic tribes in various forms (baculus, "long staff"; sceptrum, "short staff") and had various significances. The staff of command belonged to God as well as to the earthly ruler; there were the old man's staff, the messenger's wand, the shepherd's crook, and, derived from it, the bishop's, and so on.

Learn more about sceptre with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
If he tries it his sceptre will be taken away and a new dynasty established elsewhere.
Your humble servant will be well pleased to hand over the sceptre and subside.
He held out his sceptre to her, showing that he accepted her visit.
The sceptre and orb were presented, then returned to attendants.
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