scion

[sahy-uhn]
noun
1.
a descendant.
2.
Also, cion. a shoot or twig, especially one cut for grafting or planting; a cutting.

Origin:
1275–1325; ME shoot, twig < Old French cion < Frankish *kī- (compare Old English cīnan, Old Saxon kīnan, Old High German chīnan to sprout, Old English cīth, Old Saxon kīth sprout) + Old French -on noun suffix


1. child, issue, offshoot, progeny.
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World English Dictionary
scion (ˈsaɪən)
 
n
1.  a descendant, heir, or young member of a family
2.  a shoot or twig of a plant used to form a graft
 
[C14: from Old French cion, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German chīnan to sprout]

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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  scion1
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  a descendent or heir
Etymology:  Old French cion
Main Entry:  scion2
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  a detached shoot or twig of living plant, esp. used for grafting
Etymology:  Old French cion
Usage:  botany
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scion
c.1300, "a shoot or twig," from O.Fr. sion, cion (Mod.Fr. scion, Picard chion), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Frankish *kid-, from P.Gmc. *kidon-, from PIE *geie- "to sprout, split, open." Figurative use is attested from 1580s; meaning "an heir, a descendant" is from 1814, from the "family tree"
image.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
scion   (sī'ən)  Pronunciation Key 
A detached shoot or twig containing buds from a woody plant, used in grafting.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
The effect on profitability is especially striking when a family scion is chief executive.
You'd expect nothing less from the scion of legends.
The scion is cut in a wedge shape and inserted into the tree with the cambium.
The last is of the drippy scion of the once-formidable founding family, who fails even to announce the paper's closure properly.
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