scopolamine

scopolamine

[skuh-pol-uh-meen, -min, skoh-puh-lam-in]
noun Pharmacology.
a colorless, syrupy, water-soluble alkaloid, C 1 7 H 2 1 NO 4 , obtained from certain plants of the nightshade family, used chiefly as a sedative and mydriatic and to alleviate the symptoms of motion sickness.
Also called hyoscine.


Origin:
1890–95; < Neo-Latin Scopol(ia japonica) Japanese belladonna (genus Scopolia named after G.A. Scopoli (1723–88), Italian naturalist; see -a2) + amine

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To scopolamine
Collins
World English Dictionary
scopolamine (skəˈpɒləˌmiːn, -mɪn, ˌskəʊpəˈlæmɪn)
 
n
See also atropine Also called: hyoscine a colourless viscous liquid alkaloid extracted from certain plants, such as henbane: used in preventing travel sickness and as an anticholinergic, sedative, and truth serum. Formula: C17H21NO4
 
[C20 scopol- from New Latin scopolia Japonica Japanese belladonna (from which the alkaloid is extracted), named after G. A. Scopoli (1723--88), Italian naturalist, + amine]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

scopolamine sco·pol·a·mine (skə-pŏl'ə-mēn', -mĭn)
n.
A thick, syrupy, colorless alkaloid extracted from plants such as henbane and used as a mydriatic, sedative, and truth serum. Also called hyoscine.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
scopolamine   (skə-pŏl'ə-mēn', -mĭn)  Pronunciation Key 
A poisonous, syrupy, colorless alkaloid extracted from plants such as deadly nightshade and henbane. Scopolamine depresses the central nervous system and is used primarily as a sedative and to dilate the pupils, treat nausea, and prevent motion sickness. Chemical formula: C17H21NO4.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

scopolamine

alkaloid drug obtained from a number of plants of the family Solenaceae, including nightshade, henbane, and jimsonweed. Scopolamine is an effective remedy for motion sickness, probably because of its ability to depress the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Like atropine, it has a depressant action on parasympathetic nerves and in larger doses on autonomic ganglia. Scopolamine is also used to dry up secretions and dilate the bronchi during anesthesia and to dilate the pupil during ophthalmological procedures. The drug is the most pharmacologically active of several alkaloid substances found in belladonna, partly because of its greater solubility, which permits more rapid passage to the site of action

Learn more about scopolamine with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;