scorner

scorn

[skawrn]
noun
1.
open or unqualified contempt; disdain: His face and attitude showed the scorn he felt.
2.
an object of derision or contempt.
3.
a derisive or contemptuous action or speech.
verb (used with object)
4.
to treat or regard with contempt or disdain: They scorned the old beggar.
5.
to reject, refuse, or ignore with contempt or disdain: She scorned my help.
verb (used without object)
6.
to mock; jeer.
Idioms
7.
laugh to scorn, to ridicule; deride: Her good advice was laughed to scorn.

Origin:
1150–1200; (noun) Middle English scorn, scarn < Old French escarn < Germanic (compare obsolete Dutch schern mockery, trickery); (v.) Middle English skarnen, sc(h)ornen < Old French escharnir, eschernirGermanic

scorner, noun
scorningly, adverb
outscorn, verb (used with object)
self-scorn, noun
unscorned, adjective


1. contumely. See contempt. 4. disdain, contemn, despise, detest.


3. praise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
scorn (skɔːn)
 
n
1.  open contempt or disdain for a person or thing; derision
2.  an object of contempt or derision
3.  archaic an act or expression signifying contempt
 
vb
4.  to treat with contempt or derision
5.  (tr) to reject with contempt
 
[C12 schornen, from Old French escharnir, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German scerōn to behave rowdily, obsolete Dutch schern mockery]
 
'scorner
 
n
 
'scornful
 
adj
 
'scornfully
 
adv
 
'scornfulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scorn
c.1200, aphetic of O.Fr. escarn "mockery, derision, contempt," a common Romanic word (cf. Sp. escarnio, It. scherno) of Gmc. origin, from P.Gmc. *skarnjan "mock, deride" (cf. O.H.G. skern "mockery, jest, sport," M.H.G. scherzen "to jump with joy"). Probably influenced by O.Fr. escorne "affront, disgrace,"
which is a back-formation from escorner, lit. "to break off (someone's) horns," from V.L. *excornare (source of It. scornare "treat with contempt"), from L. ex- "without" + cornu "horn." The verb also is attested from c.1200.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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