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scoundrel

[skoun-druh l] /ˈskaʊn drəl/
noun
1.
an unprincipled, dishonorable person; villain.
adjective
2.
mean or base in nature; villainous; unprincipled; dishonorable.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; origin uncertain
Synonyms
1. scamp, rapscallion, miscreant. See knave.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for scoundrels
  • He called them scoundrels within the framework of the law.
  • The public has a right to know who these thieving scoundrels are.
  • Some scoundrels include an attachment that will unleash malicious spyware onto your computer.
  • He dealt mainly with high-placed scoundrels and did a good job of it.
  • There are scoundrels who work overtime to trick and defraud people.
  • Unfortunately, in this case, the records do leave us more examples of scoundrels than of heroes.
  • These greasy scoundrels are always getting themselves into mischief and detentions.
British Dictionary definitions for scoundrels

scoundrel

/ˈskaʊndrəl/
noun
1.
a worthless or villainous person
Derived Forms
scoundrelly, adjective
Word Origin
C16: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for scoundrels

scoundrel

n.

1580s, skowndrell, of unknown origin. One suggestion is Anglo-French escoundre (Old French escondre) "to hide, hide oneself," from Vulgar Latin *excondere, from Latin condere "to hide" (see abscond). The main objection to this theory is that hundreds of years lie between the two words.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
17
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