scraper

scraper

[skrey-per]
noun
1.
a person or thing that scrapes.
2.
any of various tools or utensils for scraping.

Origin:
1545–55; scrape + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
scrape (skreɪp)
 
vb
1.  to move (a rough or sharp object) across (a surface), esp to smooth or clean
2.  (tr; often foll by away or off) to remove (a layer) by rubbing
3.  to produce a harsh or grating sound by rubbing against (an instrument, surface, etc)
4.  (tr) to injure or damage by rough contact: to scrape one's knee
5.  (intr) to be very economical or sparing in the use (of) (esp in the phrase scrimp and scrape)
6.  (intr) to draw the foot backwards in making a bow
7.  (tr) to finish (a surface) by use of a scraper
8.  (tr) to make (a bearing, etc) fit by scraping
9.  bow and scrape to behave with excessive humility
 
n
10.  the act of scraping
11.  a scraped place
12.  a harsh or grating sound
13.  informal an awkward or embarrassing predicament
14.  informal a conflict or struggle
 
[Old English scrapian; related to Old Norse skrapa, Middle Dutch schrapen, Middle High German schraffen]
 
'scrapable
 
adj
 
'scraper
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

scraper

in engineering, machine for moving earth over short distances (up to about two miles) over relatively smooth areas. Either self-propelled or towed, it consists of a wagon with a gate having a bladed bottom. The blade scrapes up earth as the wagon pushes forward and forces the excavated material into the wagon. When the wagon is filled, the gate is closed, and the material is carried to the place of disposal. The scraper is the dominant tool in highway construction

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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