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screenplay

[skreen-pley] /ˈskrinˌpleɪ/
noun
1.
a motion-picture or television scenario.
2.
Older Use. a motion picture.
Origin
1915-1920
1915-20; screen + play
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for screenplay
  • The plot is endearing and fun, and points to a well-written screenplay.
  • Actually the shuttle retirement is a plot point in my comet impact screenplay.
  • Cuing screenplay writers: a good set-up to a bad disaster movie.
  • They ask the audience to find feelings and emotions that no one has bothered to write into the screenplay.
  • Bad driving, animal antics and your-fly-is-open gags are eagerly exploited, and the screenplay need not ever be believed.
  • Then, there are nominations for adapted screenplay, sound mixing and film editing.
  • The idea was a screenplay at first, but it didn't work.
  • He started talking about us working on a screenplay again.
  • Eric worked lousy jobs and started a new screenplay.
  • Yet the screenplay apparently went through some sort of airport security scanner that sucked out all the quirks.
British Dictionary definitions for screenplay

screenplay

/ˈskriːnˌpleɪ/
noun
1.
the script for a film, including instructions for sets and camera work
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for screenplay
n.

1916, from screen (n.) in the cinematic sense + play (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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