scroll

[skrohl]
noun
1.
a roll of parchment, paper, copper, or other material, especially one with writing on it: a scroll containing the entire Old Testament.
2.
something, especially an ornament, resembling a partly unrolled sheet of paper or having a spiral or coiled form.
3.
a list, roll, roster, or schedule.
4.
(in Japanese and Chinese art) a painting or text on silk or paper that is either displayed on a wall (hanging scroll) or held by the viewer (hand scroll) and is rolled up when not in use. Compare kakemono, makimono.
5.
the curved head of a violin or other bowed instrument.
6.
a note, message, or other piece of writing.
verb (used with object)
7.
to cut into a curved form with a narrow-bladed saw.
8.
Computers. to move (text) up, down, or across a display screen, with new text appearing on the screen as old text disappears.
verb (used without object)
9.
Computers. to move text vertically or horizontally on a display screen in searching for a particular section, line, etc.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English scrowle; blend of scrow, aphetic variant of escrow and rowle roll

scroll-like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
scroll (skrəʊl)
 
n
1.  a roll of parchment, paper, etc, usually inscribed with writing
2.  an ancient book in the form of a roll of parchment, papyrus, etc
3.  a.  a decorative carving or moulding resembling a scroll
 b.  (as modifier): a scroll saw
 c.  (in combination): scrollwork
 
vb
4.  (tr) to saw into scrolls
5.  to roll up like a scroll
6.  computing to move (text) from right to left or up and down on a screen in order to view text that cannot be contained within a single display image
 
[C15 scrowle, from scrowe, from Old French escroe scrap of parchment, but also influenced by roll]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scroll
c.1400, "roll of parchment or paper," altered (by association with rolle "roll") from scrowe (early 13c.), from Anglo-Fr. escrowe, O.Fr. escroe "scrap, roll of parchment," from Frank. *skroda "shred" (cf. M.Du. schroode "shred," O.H.G. scrot "piece cut off," Ger. Schrot "log, block, small shot"), from
P.Gmc. *skrautha "something cut." The verb meaning "to write down in a scroll" is recorded from c.1600; sense of "show a few lines at a time" (on a computer or TV screen) first recorded 1981. Related: Scrolled; scrolling.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

scrolling definition

chat, games
To flood a chat room or Internet game with text or macros in an attempt to annoy the occupants. This can often cause the chat room to be "uninhabitable" due to the "noise" created by the scroller. Compare spam.
(2001-03-27)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
Scrolling up and down looking for a question is a bit too much of a cognitive
  task when there's a committee on the phone.
If there's a problem with the tablet, its the less-than-stellar performance
  when scrolling in apps and playing games.
Scrolling text can be an effective means of ending or beginning a presentation.
Video is smoother than a freshly oiled veal cutlet, while scrolling through the
  music library is a breeze.
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