scrolllike

scroll

[skrohl]
noun
1.
a roll of parchment, paper, copper, or other material, especially one with writing on it: a scroll containing the entire Old Testament.
2.
something, especially an ornament, resembling a partly unrolled sheet of paper or having a spiral or coiled form.
3.
a list, roll, roster, or schedule.
4.
(in Japanese and Chinese art) a painting or text on silk or paper that is either displayed on a wall (hanging scroll) or held by the viewer (hand scroll) and is rolled up when not in use. Compare kakemono, makimono.
5.
the curved head of a violin or other bowed instrument.
6.
a note, message, or other piece of writing.
verb (used with object)
7.
to cut into a curved form with a narrow-bladed saw.
8.
Computers. to move (text) up, down, or across a display screen, with new text appearing on the screen as old text disappears.
verb (used without object)
9.
Computers. to move text vertically or horizontally on a display screen in searching for a particular section, line, etc.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English scrowle; blend of scrow, aphetic variant of escrow and rowle roll

scroll-like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
scroll (skrəʊl)
 
n
1.  a roll of parchment, paper, etc, usually inscribed with writing
2.  an ancient book in the form of a roll of parchment, papyrus, etc
3.  a.  a decorative carving or moulding resembling a scroll
 b.  (as modifier): a scroll saw
 c.  (in combination): scrollwork
 
vb
4.  (tr) to saw into scrolls
5.  to roll up like a scroll
6.  computing to move (text) from right to left or up and down on a screen in order to view text that cannot be contained within a single display image
 
[C15 scrowle, from scrowe, from Old French escroe scrap of parchment, but also influenced by roll]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scroll
c.1400, "roll of parchment or paper," altered (by association with rolle "roll") from scrowe (early 13c.), from Anglo-Fr. escrowe, O.Fr. escroe "scrap, roll of parchment," from Frank. *skroda "shred" (cf. M.Du. schroode "shred," O.H.G. scrot "piece cut off," Ger. Schrot "log, block, small shot"), from
P.Gmc. *skrautha "something cut." The verb meaning "to write down in a scroll" is recorded from c.1600; sense of "show a few lines at a time" (on a computer or TV screen) first recorded 1981. Related: Scrolled; scrolling.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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