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secluded

[si-kloo-did] /sɪˈklu dɪd/
adjective
1.
sheltered or screened from general activity, view, etc.:
a secluded cottage.
2.
withdrawn from or involving little human or social activity:
a secluded life.
Origin of secluded
1595-1605
1595-1605; seclude + -ed2
Related forms
secludedly, adverb
secludedness, noun
nonsecluded, adjective
nonsecludedly, adverb
nonsecludedness, noun
unsecluded, adjective
unsecludedly, adverb
well-secluded, adjective
Synonyms
isolated, retired, sequestered, cloistered, private, secret.

seclude

[si-klood] /sɪˈklud/
verb (used with object), secluded, secluding.
1.
to place in or withdraw into solitude; remove from social contact and activity, etc.
2.
to isolate; shut off; keep apart:
They secluded the garden from the rest of the property.
Origin
1425-75; late Middle English < Latin sēclūdere, equivalent to sē- se- + -clūdere, combining form of claudere to close
Related forms
unsecluding, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for secluded
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • In this manner she deceives all, even her husband, and hides herself away in some secluded nook, near a stream or hole of water.

  • My laboratory I found to be almost as secluded as my living quarters.

    City of Endless Night Milo Hastings
  • This was a private lane, which ran through the recesses of the Chace where the wood was thickest and most secluded.

    Round About a Great Estate Richard Jefferies
  • Women were secluded from all civic life and from all intellectual culture.

    The Truth About Woman C. Gasquoine Hartley
  • I do not think I can then endure this place without him—but there are others as secluded.

    The Tempering Charles Neville Buck
British Dictionary definitions for secluded

secluded

/sɪˈkluːdɪd/
adjective
1.
kept apart from the company of others: a secluded life
2.
sheltered; private
Derived Forms
secludedly, adverb
secludedness, noun

seclude

/sɪˈkluːd/
verb (transitive)
1.
to remove from contact with others
2.
to shut off or screen from view
Word Origin
C15: from Latin sēclūdere to shut off, from sē- + claudere to imprison
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for secluded
adj.

c.1600, of persons; in reference to places, 1798, past participle adjective from seclude (v.). Earlier secluse (1590s).

seclude

v.

mid-15c., "to shut up, enclose, confine," from Latin secludere "shut off, confine," from se- "apart" (see secret) + -cludere, variant of claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). Meaning "to remove or guard from public view" is recorded from 1620s. Related: Secluded; secluding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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