sedating

sedate

[si-deyt]
adjective
1.
calm, quiet, or composed; undisturbed by passion or excitement: a sedate party; a sedate horse.
verb (used with object), sedated, sedating.
2.
to put (a person) under sedation.

Origin:
1640–50; < Latin sēdātus (past participle of sēdāre to allay, quieten); akin to sedēre to sit1

sedately, adverb
sedateness, noun
unsedate, adjective
unsedately, adverb
unsedateness, noun


1. collected, serene, unruffled, unperturbed. See staid.
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World English Dictionary
sedate1 (sɪˈdeɪt)
 
adj
1.  habitually calm and composed in manner; serene
2.  staid, sober, or decorous
 
[C17: from Latin sēdāre to soothe; related to sedēre to sit]
 
se'dately1
 
adv
 
se'dateness1
 
n

sedate2 (sɪˈdeɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to administer a sedative to
 
[C20: back formation from sedative]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sedate
1663, from L. sedatus "composed, moderate, quiet, tranquil," pp. of sedare "to settle, calm," causative of sedere "to sit" (see sedentary). The verb meaning "treat with sedatives" is a 1945 back-formation from the noun derivative of sedative (adj.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

sedate se·date (sĭ-dāt')
v. se·dat·ed, se·dat·ing, se·dates
To administer a sedative to; calm or relieve by means of a sedative drug.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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