see daylight

daylight

[dey-lahyt]
noun
1.
the light of day: At the end of the tunnel they could see daylight.
2.
public knowledge or awareness; openness: The newspaper article brought the scandal out into the daylight.
3.
the period of day; daytime.
4.
daybreak; dawn.
5.
a clear space between any two parts that should be close together, as between the jambs of the opening of a doorway or the knees of a horseback rider and a saddle.
6.
daylights, mental soundness; consciousness; wits: The noise scared the daylights out of us.
adjective
7.
Photography. of, pertaining to, or being film made for exposure by the natural light of day.
verb (used with object), daylighted or daylit, daylighting.
8.
to suffuse (an interior space) with artificial light or with daylight filtered through translucent materials, as roofing panels.
Idioms
9.
see daylight, to progress to a point where completion of a difficult task seems possible or probable.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English; see day, light1

predaylight, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
daylight (ˈdeɪˌlaɪt)
 
n
1.  a.  light from the sun
 b.  (as modifier): daylight film
2.  the period when it is light; daytime
3.  daybreak
4.  see daylight
 a.  to understand something previously obscure
 b.  to realize that the end of a difficult task is approaching

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

daylight
c.1300, from day + light (n.); its figurative sense of "clearly visible open space between two things" (1820) has been used in references to boats in a race, U.S. football running backs avoiding opposing tackles, a rider and a saddle, and the rim
of a glass and the surface of the liquor. The daylights that you beat out of someone were originally slang for "the eyes" (1752), extended figuratively to the vital senses.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

see daylight

see begin to see daylight.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Idioms & Phrases
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