self-commitment

commitment

[kuh-mit-muhnt]
noun
1.
the act of committing.
2.
the state of being committed.
3.
the act of committing, pledging, or engaging oneself.
4.
a pledge or promise; obligation: We have made a commitment to pay our bills on time.
5.
engagement; involvement: They have a sincere commitment to religion.
6.
perpetration or commission, as of a crime.
7.
consignment, as to prison.
8.
confinement to a mental institution or hospital: The psychiatrist recommended commitment.
9.
an order, as by a court or judge, confining a person to a mental institution or hospital.
10.
Law. a written order of a court directing that someone be confined in prison; mittimus.
11.
Parliamentary Procedure. the act of referring or entrusting to a committee for consideration.
12.
Stock Exchange.
a.
an agreement to buy or sell securities.
b.
a sale or purchase of securities.
Also, committal (for defs 1, 3–11).


Origin:
1605–15; commit + -ment

noncommitment, noun
precommitment, adjective
self-commitment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
commitment (kəˈmɪtmənt, kəˈmɪtəl)
 
n
1.  the act of committing or pledging
2.  the state of being committed or pledged
3.  an obligation, promise, etc that restricts one's freedom of action
4.  the referral of a bill to a committee or legislature
5.  law Also called (esp formerly): mittimus a written order of a court directing that a person be imprisoned
6.  the official consignment of a person to a mental hospital or prison
7.  commission or perpetration, esp of a crime
8.  a future financial obligation or contingent liability

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

commitment
1611, from commit + -ment. (Anglo-Fr. had commettement.) Meaning "the committing of oneself" is attested from 1793; hence, "an obligation" (1864).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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