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conditioning

[kuh n-dish-uh-ning] /kənˈdɪʃ ə nɪŋ/
noun, Psychology
1.
Also called operant conditioning, instrumental conditioning. a process of changing behavior by rewarding or punishing a subject each time an action is performed until the subject associates the action with pleasure or distress.
2.
Also called classical conditioning, Pavlovian conditioning, respondent conditioning. a process in which a stimulus that was previously neutral, as the sound of a bell, comes to evoke a particular response, as salivation, by being repeatedly paired with another stimulus that normally evokes the response, as the taste of food.
Origin
1915-1920
1915-20; condition + -ing1
Related forms
self-conditioning, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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self-conditioning in Medicine

conditioning con·di·tion·ing (kən-dĭsh'ə-nĭng)
n.
A process of behavior modification by which a subject comes to associate a desired behavior with a previously unrelated stimulus.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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self-conditioning in Science
conditioning
  (kən-dĭsh'ə-nĭng)   
See classical conditioning.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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