selflighting

lighting

[lahy-ting]
noun
1.
the act of igniting or illuminating: the lighting of many candles; the annual lighting of the Christmas tree.
2.
the arrangement of lights to achieve particular effects: to work out the lighting for one's living room.
3.
an effect achieved by the arrangement of lights: Several critics praised the lighting of the play.
4.
the science, theory, or method of achieving particular effects by the use of lights.
5.
the way light falls upon a face, object, etc., especially in a picture.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English lightinge, Old English līhting. See light1, -ing1

self-lighting, adjective
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World English Dictionary
lighting (ˈlaɪtɪŋ)
 
n
1.  the act or quality of illumination or ignition
2.  the apparatus for supplying artificial light effects to a stage, film, or television set
3.  the distribution of light on an object or figure, as in painting, photography, etc

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

light
"brightness," O.E. leht, earlier leoht, from W.Gmc. *leukhtam (cf. O.Fris. liacht, M.Du. lucht, Ger. Licht), from PIE *leuk- "light, brightness" (cf. Skt. rocate "shines;" Arm. lois "light," lusin "moon;" Gk. leukos "bright, shining, white;" L. lucere "to shine," lux "light," lucidus "clear;" O.C.S.
luci "light;" Lith. laukas "pale;" Welsh llug "gleam, glimmer;" O.Ir. loche "lightning," luchair "brightness;" Hittite lukezi "is bright"). The -gh- was an Anglo-Fr. scribal attempt to render the O.E. hard -h- sound, which has since disappeared. The figurative spiritual sense was in O.E.; the sense of "mental illumination" is first recorded mid-15c. Meaning "something used for igniting" is from 1680s. The related verb is from O.E. lyhtan (cf. O.S. liohtian, Ger. leuchten, Goth. liuhtjan).

light
"not heavy," from O.E. leoht, from P.Gmc. *lingkhtaz (cf. O.N. lettr, Swed. lätt, O.Fris., M.Du. licht, Ger. leicht, Goth. leihts), from PIE base *le(n)gwh- "light, easy, agile, nimble" (cf. L. levis "light;" see lever). The notion in make light of (1520s) is of "unimportance."
Alternative spelling lite, the darling of advertisers, is first recorded 1962. Light-skirts "woman of easy virtue" is attested from 1590s.

light
"touch down," from O.E. lihtan "to alight," from P.Gmc. *linkhtijan, lit. "to make light," from *lingkhtaz "not heavy" (see light (adj.)). Apparently the ground sense is "to dismount a horse, etc., and thus relieve it of one's weight." To light out "leave hastily" is 1870,
from a nautical meaning "move out, move heavy objects," of unknown origin but perhaps belonging to this word.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

light (līt)
n.

  1. Electromagnetic radiation that has a wavelength in the range from about 4,000 (violet) to about 7,700 (red) angstroms and may be perceived by the normal unaided human eye.

  2. Electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
light   (līt)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. Electromagnetic radiation that can be perceived by the human eye. It is made up of electromagnetic waves with wavelengths between 4 × 10-7 and 7 × 10-7 meters. Light, and all other electromagnetic radiation, travels at a speed of about 299,728 km (185,831 mi) per second in a vacuum. See also photon.

  2. Electromagnetic energy of a wavelength just outside the range the human eye can detect, such as infrared light and ultraviolet light. See Note at electromagnetic radiation.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

light definition


The type of electromagnetic wave that is visible to the human eye. Visible light runs along a spectrum from the short wavelengths of violet to the longer wavelengths of red. (See photon.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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