semihumanism

humanism

[hyoo-muh-niz-uhm or, often, yoo-]
noun
1.
any system or mode of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity predominate.
2.
devotion to or study of the humanities.
3.
(sometimes initial capital letter) the studies, principles, or culture of the humanists.
4.
Philosophy. a variety of ethical theory and practice that emphasizes reason, scientific inquiry, and human fulfillment in the natural world and often rejects the importance of belief in God.

Origin:
1805–15; human + -ism

antihumanism, noun
semihumanism, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
humanism (ˈhjuːməˌnɪzəm)
 
n
1.  the denial of any power or moral value superior to that of humanity; the rejection of religion in favour of a belief in the advancement of humanity by its own efforts
2.  a philosophical position that stresses the autonomy of human reason in contradistinction to the authority of the Church
3.  (often capital) a cultural movement of the Renaissance, based on classical studies
4.  interest in the welfare of people
 
'humanist
 
n
 
human'istic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

humanism
along with humanist used in a variety of philosophical and theological senses 16c.-18c., especially ones imitating L. humanitas "education befitting a cultivated man." Main modern sense traces to c.1860; as a pragmatic system of thought, defined 1907 by co-founder F.C.S. Schiller as: "The perception
that the philosophical problem concerns human beings striving to comprehend a world of human experience by the resources of human minds." Humanist is from Fr. humaniste, from It. umanista, coined by It. poet Lodovicio Ariosto (1474-1533) "student of human affairs or human nature."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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