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sententious

[sen-ten-shuh s] /sɛnˈtɛn ʃəs/
adjective
1.
abounding in pithy aphorisms or maxims:
a sententious book.
2.
given to excessive moralizing; self-righteous.
3.
given to or using pithy sayings or maxims:
a sententious poet.
4.
of the nature of a maxim; pithy.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English < Latin sententiōsus meaningful. See sentence, -ous
Related forms
sententiously, adverb
sententiousness, sententiosity
[sen-ten-shee-os-i-tee] /sɛnˌtɛn ʃiˈɒs ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
noun
nonsententious, adjective
nonsententiously, adverb
nonsententiousness, noun
unsententious, adjective
unsententiously, adverb
unsententiousness, noun
Synonyms
2. preachy, didactic, sanctimonious, moralistic.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for sententious
  • When he is not delivering sententious commonplaces or indulging in heavy whimsy, he makes an agreeable guide.
  • They succeeded, becoming prosperous, and piety mingled with smugness made the whole family insufferably sententious.
  • To be really bad, a film should be pretentious and sententious.
  • It even, on occasion, goes so far as to parody the movies in their more sententious moments.
  • sententious, witty sayings ap pear on almost every page.
British Dictionary definitions for sententious

sententious

/sɛnˈtɛnʃəs/
adjective
1.
characterized by or full of aphorisms, terse pithy sayings, or axioms
2.
constantly using aphorisms, etc
3.
tending to indulge in pompous moralizing
Derived Forms
sententiously, adverb
sententiousness, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin sententiōsus full of meaning, from sententia; see sentence
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sententious
adj.

mid-15c., "full of meaning," from Middle French sententieux, from Latin sententiosus "full of meaning, pithy," from sententia "thought; expression of a thought" (see sentence (n.)). Meaning "addicted to pompous moralizing" first recorded 1590s. Related: Sententiously; sententiousness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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