settlement

[set-l-muhnt]
noun
1.
the act or state of settling or the state of being settled.
2.
the act of making stable or putting on a permanent basis.
3.
a state of stability or permanence.
4.
an arrangement or adjustment, as of business affairs or a disagreement.
5.
an agreement signed after labor negotiations between union and management.
6.
the terms reached in this agreement.
7.
the settling of persons in a new country or place.
8.
a colony, especially in its early stages.
9.
a small community, village, or group of houses in a thinly populated area.
10.
a community formed and populated by members of a particular religious or ideological group: a Shaker settlement.
11.
the satisfying of a claim or demand; a coming to terms.
12.
Law.
a.
final disposition of an estate or the like.
b.
the settling of property, title, etc., upon a person.
c.
the property so settled.
13.
British.
a.
legal residence in a specific place.
b.
(of a pauper) the right to claim food and shelter from an official agency or specific town or district.
14.
Also called settlement house. Social Work. an establishment in an underprivileged area providing social services to local residents.
15.
a subsidence or sinking of all or part of a structure.

Origin:
1620–30; settle1 + -ment

nonsettlement, noun
oversettlement, noun
presettlement, noun
resettlement, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
settlement (ˈsɛtəlmənt)
 
n
1.  the act or state of settling or being settled
2.  the establishment of a new region; colonization
3.  a place newly settled; colony
4.  a collection of dwellings forming a community, esp on a frontier
5.  a community formed by members of a group, esp of a religious sect
6.  a public building used to provide educational and general welfare facilities for persons living in deprived areas
7.  a subsidence of all or part of a structure
8.  a.  the payment of an outstanding account, invoice, charge, etc
 b.  (as modifier): settlement day
9.  an adjustment or agreement reached in matters of finance, business, etc
10.  law
 a.  a conveyance, usually to trustees, of property to be enjoyed by several persons in succession
 b.  the deed or other instrument conveying such property
 c.  the determination of a dispute, etc, by mutual agreement without resorting to legal proceedings

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

settlement
1645, "act of fixing or steadying;" from settle (v.). Meaning "colony" is attested from 1697; that of "payment of an account" is from 1729
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

settlement houses definition


Social and cultural centers established by reformers in slum areas of American cities during the 1890s and the early 1900s. Jane Addams founded the most famous settlement house, in Chicago. (See Progressive movement.)

Note: Settlement houses attracted idealistic college graduates eager to learn how the poor lived and to improve the condition of the poor.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
In this period the conscience of the community lives only in those outposts of civilization known as settlement houses.
Stores, settlement houses, and private homes were used as polling places.
Settlement houses were created to provide community services to ease urban problems such as poverty.
Social workers went into the slums to establish settlement houses, which provided the poor with health services and recreation.
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