shallows

shallow

[shal-oh]
adjective, shallower, shallowest.
1.
of little depth; not deep: shallow water.
2.
lacking depth; superficial: a mind that is not narrow but shallow.
3.
taking in a relatively small amount of air in each inhalation: shallow breathing.
4.
Baseball. relatively close to home plate: The shortstop caught the pop fly in shallow left field.
noun
5.
Usually, shallows. (used with a singular or plural verb) a shallow part of a body of water; shoal.
adverb
6.
Baseball. at a shallow position: With the pitcher up, the outfielders played shallow.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
7.
to make or become shallow.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English schalowe (adj.); akin to Old English sceald shallow (see shoal1)

shallowly, adverb
shallowness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
shallow (ˈʃæləʊ)
 
adj
1.  having little depth
2.  lacking intellectual or mental depth or subtlety; superficial
 
n
3.  (often plural) a shallow place in a body of water; shoal
 
vb
4.  to make or become shallow
 
[C15: related to Old English sceald shallow; see shoal1]
 
'shallowly
 
adv
 
'shallowness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shallow
c.1400, schalowe "not deep," probably from O.E. sceald (see shoal). Of breathing, attested from 1875; of thought or feeling, "superficial," first recorded c.1586. The noun, usually shallows, is first recorded 1571, from the adj.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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