sheaves

1 [sheevz]
noun
plural of sheaf.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

sheaves

2 [shivz, sheevz]
noun
plural of sheave2.

sheaf

[sheef]
noun, plural sheaves.
1.
one of the bundles in which cereal plants, as wheat, rye, etc., are bound after reaping.
2.
any bundle, cluster, or collection: a sheaf of papers.
verb (used with object)
3.
to bind (something) into a sheaf or sheaves.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English shefe (noun), Old English schēaf; cognate with Dutch schoof sheaf, German Schaub wisp of straw, Old Norse skauf tail of a fox

sheaflike, adjective

sheave

1 [sheev]
verb (used with object), sheaved, sheaving.
to gather, collect, or bind into a sheaf or sheaves.

Origin:
1570–80; derivative of sheaf

sheave

2 [shiv, sheev]
noun
1.
a pulley for hoisting or hauling, having a grooved rim for retaining a wire rope.
2.
a wheel with a grooved rim, for transmitting force to a cable or belt.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English schive; akin to Dutch schijf sheave, German Scheibe disk

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sheaf (ʃiːf)
 
n , pl sheaves
1.  a bundle of reaped but unthreshed corn tied with one or two bonds
2.  a bundle of objects tied together
3.  the arrows contained in a quiver
 
vb
4.  (tr) to bind or tie into a sheaf
 
[Old English sceaf, related to Old High German skoub sheaf, Old Norse skauf tail, Gothic skuft tuft of hair]

sheave1 (ʃiːv)
 
vb
(tr) to gather or bind into sheaves

sheave2 (ʃiːv)
 
n
a wheel with a grooved rim, esp one used as a pulley
 
[C14: of Germanic origin; compare Old High German scība disc]

sheaves (ʃiːvz)
 
n
the plural of sheaf

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sheaf
O.E. sceaf "sheaf of corn," from P.Gmc. *skaubaz (cf. M.Du. scoof, O.H.G. scoub, Ger. Schaub "sheaf;" O.N. skauf "fox's tail;" Goth. skuft "hair on the head," Ger. Schopf "tuft"). Also used in M.E. for "two dozen arrows."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Scenes featured workers hefting hoes and spades, or farm maidens bearing
  sheaves and sickles.
Mechanical reapers became even more efficient when adapted to bale the stalks
  into sheaves, too.
Each angrily shakes at the other sheaves of valid examples of information spin
  and social policy influence.
Gathering in the sheaves of supporters is a large task.
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