shoos

shoo

[shoo]
interjection
1.
(used to scare or drive away a cat, dog, chickens, birds, etc.)
verb (used with object), shooed, shooing.
2.
to drive away by saying or shouting “shoo.”
3.
to request or force (a person) to leave: I'll have to shoo you out of here now.
verb (used without object), shooed, shooing.
4.
to call out “shoo.”

Origin:
1475–85; earlier showe, shough, shooh, ssou (interjection), imitative; compare German schu

shoe, shoo.
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World English Dictionary
shoo (ʃuː)
 
interj
1.  go away!: used to drive away unwanted or annoying people, animals, etc
 
vb , shoos, shooing, shooed
2.  (tr) to drive away by or as if by crying "shoo."
3.  (intr) to cry "shoo."
 
[C15: imitative; related to Middle High German schū, French shou, Italian scio]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shoo
1620s, "to drive away by calling 'shoo,' " from the exclamation (late 15c.), instinctive, cf. Ger. schu, It. scioia. Shoo-in "easy winner (especially in politics)" (1939) was originally a horse that wins a race by pre-arrangement (1928; the verb phrase shoo in in this sense is from 1908). Shoo-fly, admonition
to a pest, was popularized by a Dan Bryant minstrel song c.1870, which launched it as a catch-phrase that, according to H.L. Mencken, "afflicted the American people for at least two years." Shoo-fly pie is attested from 1935.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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