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shoring

[shawr-ing, shohr-] /ˈʃɔr ɪŋ, ˈʃoʊr-/
noun
1.
a number or system of shores for steadying or supporting a wall, a ship in drydock, etc.
2.
the act of setting up shores.
Origin
1490-1500
1490-1500; shore2 + -ing1

shore2

[shawr, shohr] /ʃɔr, ʃoʊr/
noun
1.
a supporting post or beam with auxiliary members, especially one placed obliquely against the side of a building, a ship in drydock, or the like; prop; strut.
verb (used with object), shored, shoring.
2.
to support by or as if by a shore or shores; prop (usually followed by up):
to shore up a roof; government subsidies to shore up falling corn prices.
Origin
1300-50; (noun) Middle English; cognate with Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schore prop; (v.) shoren, derivative of the noun
Synonyms
1. brace, buttress, stay.

shore3

[shawr, shohr] /ʃɔr, ʃoʊr/
verb (used with object), shored, shoring. Scot. and North England
1.
to threaten (someone).
2.
to offer or proffer (something).
Origin
1325-75; Middle English (Scots) schore < ?
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for shoring
  • Every meter had to be won the old-fashioned way, by blasting or excavating with conventional machines and shoring up.
  • Cadres of ecological engineers should join civil engineers in shoring up the nation's flood defenses.
  • Slowly teams of inspectors worked through them, shoring them up.
  • Inventory technology and off-shoring helps large companies control costs.
  • Some salaries have flat-lined, while other jobs have simply disappeared thanks to off-shoring and automated technology.
  • Don't expect this to be a year of recovery or even shoring.
  • Higher stock prices and signs real estate is on the mend may be shoring up sentiment among both groups.
  • As per my view, stimulus help sinking ship for a while through shoring, without going behind the cause of leakages.
  • He quickly stepped in to praise credit derivatives for shoring up the stability of the global financial system.
  • shoring up our economy, and putting it back on the right track.
British Dictionary definitions for shoring

shore1

/ʃɔː/
noun
1.
the land along the edge of a sea, lake, or wide river related adjective littoral
2.
  1. land, as opposed to water (esp in the phrase on shore)
  2. (as modifier) shore duty
3.
(law) the tract of coastland lying between the ordinary marks of high and low water
4.
(often pl) a country his native shores
verb
5.
(transitive) to move or drag (a boat) onto a shore
Word Origin
C14: probably from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schōre; compare Old High German scorra cliff; see shear

shore2

/ʃɔː/
noun
1.
a prop, post, or beam used to support a wall, building, ship in dry dock, etc
verb
2.
(transitive) often foll by up. to prop or make safe with or as if with a shore
Derived Forms
shoring, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Middle Dutch schōre; related to Old Norse skortha prop

shore3

/ʃɔː/
verb
1.
(Austral & NZ) a past tense of shear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for shoring
shore
c.1300, "land bordering a large body of water," perhaps from M.L.G. schor "shore, coast, headland," or M.Du. scorre "land washed by the sea," probably from P.Gmc. *skur- "cut" and according to etymologists originally with a sense of "division" between land and water, and thus related to O.E. sceran "shear, to cut" (see shear). But if the word originated on the North Sea coast of the continent, it may as well have meant "land 'cut off' from the mainland by tidal marshes" (cf. O.N. skerg "an isolated rock in the sea," related to sker "to cut, shear"). Few I.E. languages have such a single comprehensive word for "land bordering water" (Gk. had one word for sandy beaches, another for rocky headlands). General application to "country near a seacoast" is attested from 1611.
shore
mid-14c., "to prop, support with a prop;" of obscure etymology though widespread in W.Gmc.; cf. M.Du. schooren "to prop up, support," O.N. skorða (n.) "a piece of timber set up as a support."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for shoring

form of prop or support, usually temporary, that is used during the repair or original construction of buildings and in excavations. Temporary support may be required, for example, to relieve the load on a masonry wall while it is repaired or reinforced. The support may be supplied by shoring the wall with heavy timbers sloping upward at about 65 to 75. The top of the timber is so arranged that part of the wall load is transferred onto it, while the lower end of the timber is framed onto a base to transfer the load to the ground with minimum deformation. Wedges may be used to bring the shore snugly into contact with the wall. If the wall is several stories high, a vertical series of shores may be required. Shores are also used to support the forms for cast-in-place concrete slabs, beams, and girders in reinforced concrete frames.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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