show piece

showing

[shoh-ing]
noun
1.
a show, display, or exhibition.
2.
the act of putting something on display.
3.
a performance or record considered for the impression it makes: She made a bad showing in high school but did better in college.
4.
a setting forth or presentation, as of facts or conditions.
5.
Also called show piece. a rock specimen revealing the presence of a certain mineral.

Origin:
before 950; Middle English schewing (gerund), Old English scēawung; see show, -ing1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
showing (ˈʃəʊɪŋ)
 
n
1.  a presentation, exhibition, or display
2.  manner of presentation; performance
3.  evidence

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

show
O.E. sceawian "to look at, see," from W.Gmc. *skauwojanan (cf. O.S. skauwon "to look at," O.Fris. skawia, Du. schouwen, O.H.G. scouwon "to look at;" Du. schoon, Goth. skaunjai "beautiful," originally "conspicuous"), from P.Gmc. root *skau- "behold, look at," from PIE *skou-, variant of base *skeue-
"to pay attention, perceive" (see caveat). Causal meaning "let be seen, put in sight, make known" evolved c.1200 for unknown reasons and is unique to Eng. (Ger. schauen still means "look at"). Spelling shew, popular 18c. and surviving into early 19c., represents obsolete pronunciation (rhymes with view).

show
c.1300, "act of exhibiting to view," from show (v.). Sense of "appearance put on with intention to deceive" is recorded from c.1526. Meaning "display, spectacle" is first recorded 1561; that of "ostentatious display" is from 1713 (showy is from 1712). Sense of "entertainment
program on radio or TV" is first recorded 1932. Meaning "third place in a horse race" is from 1925, Amer.Eng. Show of hands is attested from 1789; Phrase for show "for appearance's sake" is from c.1700. Show business is attested from 1850; shortened form show biz first attested 1945. Expression the show must go on is first attested 1941. Show-stopper is from 1926; show trial first recorded 1937.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

show (shō)
n.

  1. The first discharge of blood in menstruation.

  2. The discharge of bloody mucus from the vagina indicating the start of labor.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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