shrugged off

shrug

[shruhg]
verb (used with object), shrugged, shrugging.
1.
to raise and contract (the shoulders), expressing indifference, disdain, etc.
verb (used without object), shrugged, shrugging.
2.
to raise and contract the shoulders.
noun
3.
the movement of raising and contracting the shoulders.
4.
a short sweater or jacket that ends above or at the waistline.
Verb phrases
5.
shrug off,
a.
to disregard; minimize: to shrug off an insult.
b.
to rid oneself of: to shrug off the effects of a drug.

Origin:
1350–1400; (v.) Middle English schruggen to shudder, shrug < ?; (noun) late Middle English shrugge a tug, pull, derivative of the v.

unshrugging, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
shrug (ʃrʌɡ)
 
vb , shrugs, shrugging, shrugged
1.  to draw up and drop (the shoulders) abruptly in a gesture expressing indifference, contempt, ignorance, etc
 
n
2.  the gesture so made
3.  a woman's short jacket or close-fitting cardigan
 
[C14: of uncertain origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shrug
c.1400, schurgyng, of uncertain origin. Perhaps connected to Dan. skrugge "to stoop, crouch." The noun is first recorded 1594. To shrug (something) off "dismiss" is recorded from 1909.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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