shutter

[shuht-er]
noun
1.
a solid or louvered movable cover for a window.
2.
a movable cover, slide, etc., for an opening.
3.
a person or thing that shuts.
4.
Photography. a mechanical device for opening and closing the aperture of a camera lens to expose film or the like.
verb (used with object)
5.
to close or provide with shutters: She shuttered the windows.
6.
to close (a store or business operations) for the day or permanently.
verb (used without object)
7.
to close or close down: The factory has shuttered temporarily.

Origin:
1535–45; shut + -er1

shutterless, adjective
unshuttered, adjective

shudder, shutter.


1. See curtain.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
shutter (ˈʃʌtə)
 
n
1.  a hinged doorlike cover, often louvred and usually one of a pair, for closing off a window
2.  put up the shutters to close business at the end of the day or permanently
3.  photog an opaque shield in a camera that, when tripped, admits light to expose the film or plate for a predetermined period, usually a fraction of a second. It is either built into the lens system or lies in the focal plane of the lens (focal-plane shutter)
4.  photog a rotating device in a film projector that permits an image to be projected onto the screen only when the film is momentarily stationary
5.  music one of the louvred covers over the mouths of organ pipes, operated by the swell pedal
6.  a person or thing that shuts
 
vb
7.  to close with or as if with a shutter or shutters
8.  to equip with a shutter or shutters

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shutter
1540s, "one who shuts" (see shut); meaning "moveable wooden or iron screen for a window" is from 1683. Photographic sense of "device for opening and closing the aperture of a lens" is from 1862. The verb is recorded from 1826. Shutter-bug "enthusiastic amateur photographer" is from 1940.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But there was much more to those tiny shuttered creatures than anyone suspected.
Rising seniors will be able to complete the program before it is shuttered.
The shuttered eyelid gracing the cover of this slim book invites readers to
  enter a silent realm.
Along with other expenses, editorial budgets must retract until they are
  rational or the publication will be shuttered.
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