Word Origin & History

siddha
in Indian religion, "one who has attained perfection and bliss," 1846, from Skt. siddhah "accomplished, achieved, successful, possessing supernatural power, sorcerer, saint," related to sidhyati "reaches his goal, succeeds," sadhuh "right, skilled, excellent, a holy man."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

siddha

in Jainism, one who has achieved perfection. By right faith, right knowledge, and right conduct a siddha has freed himself from the cycle of rebirths and resides in a state of perpetual bliss in the siddha-sila, at the top of the universe. The siddha and the other ascetics constitute the panca-paramesthin, the five chief divinities of the Jainas. Their figures are represented on a silver or brass tray called a siddha-cakra (saint-wheel), to which great sanctity and magical power are attributed. In the twice-yearly ceremony known as oli, the images are washed and anointed, and offerings of rice, sweetmeats, and fruit are made.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences for siddha
An arhat becomes a siddha, the liberated one, after attaining nirvana.
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