sidle

[sahyd-l]
verb (used without object), sidled, sidling.
1.
to move sideways or obliquely.
2.
to edge along furtively.
noun
3.
a sidling movement.

Origin:
1690–1700; back formation from sideling (earlier spelling sidling misconstrued as present participle of a verb ending in -le)

sidlingly, adverb
unsidling, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
sidle (ˈsaɪdəl)
 
vb
1.  to move in a furtive or stealthy manner; edge along
2.  to move along sideways
 
n
3.  a sideways movement
 
[C17: back formation from obsolete sideling sideways]
 
'sidler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

sidle
"to move or go sideways," 1690s, back-formation from obsolete M.E. sidlyng (adv.) "obliquely, sideways" (early 14c.), from side + adv. suffix -ling; altered on analogy of verbs ending in -le.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The donkey sidles up to her with its evil, silly grin.
Snuggled in her nightgown, she often sidles up to her home-office computer to surf the shopping sites.
After a while, she sidles over to the teacher, gradually inching closer until she is almost on the teacher's lap.
The gray, spotted pony sidles shyly beside the mares.
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