silicone

[sil-i-kohn]
noun Chemistry.
any of a number of polymers containing alternate silicon and oxygen atoms, as (–Si–O–Si–O–) n, whose properties are determined by the organic groups attached to the silicon atoms, and that are fluid, resinous, rubbery, extremely stable in high temperatures, and water-repellent: used as adhesives, lubricants, and hydraulic oils and in electrical insulation, cosmetics, etc.

Origin:
1905–10; silic(on) + -one

silicon, silicone.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To silicone
Collins
World English Dictionary
silicone (ˈsɪlɪˌkəʊn)
 
n
chem See also siloxane
 a.  any of a large class of polymeric synthetic materials that usually have resistance to temperature, water, and chemicals, and good insulating and lubricating properties, making them suitable for wide use as oils, water-repellents, resins, etc. Chemically they have alternate silicon and oxygen atoms with the silicon atoms bound to organic groups
 b.  (as modifier): silicone rubber

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

silicone sil·i·cone (sĭl'ĭ-kōn')
n.
Any of a group of silicon compounds in solid, liquid, or gel form, characterized by wide-range thermal stability, high lubricity, extreme water repellence, and physiological inertness and used in many medical products, including surgical implants and dental impression materials.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
silicone   (sĭl'ĭ-kōn')  Pronunciation Key 
Any of a class of chemical compounds consisting of long chains of alternating silicon and oxygen atoms, with two organic radicals, typically a methyl (CH3) and a phenyl (C6H5) group, attached to each silicon atom. Silicones are very stable and resist the effects of water, heat, and oxidizing agents. They are used to make adhesives, lubricants and synthetic rubber.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
It puts a slippy silicone layer right at that spot so that the friction is
  reduced.
After that, light-sensitive silicone lenses may arrive.
Its outer casing is made of silicone and is fitted with pressure sensors so
  that it knows what it is touching.
It is able to do this because it is filled with a mineral oil that slowly
  diffuses through the silicone.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature