silo

[sahy-loh]
noun, plural silos.
1.
a structure, typically cylindrical, in which fodder or forage is kept.
2.
a pit or underground space for storing grain, green feeds, etc.
3.
Military. an underground installation constructed of concrete and steel, designed to house a ballistic missile and the equipment for firing it.
verb (used with object), siloed, siloing.
4.
to put into or preserve in a silo.

Origin:
1825–35; < Spanish: place for storing grain, hay, etc., orig. subterranean; ulterior origin uncertain

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To silo
Collins
World English Dictionary
silo (ˈsaɪləʊ)
 
n , pl -los
1.  a pit, trench, horizontal container, or tower, often cylindrical in shape, in which silage is made and stored
2.  a strengthened underground position in which missile systems are sited for protection against attack
 
[C19: from Spanish, perhaps from Celtic]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

silo
1835, from Sp. silo, from L. sirum (nom. sirus), from Gk. siros "a pit to keep corn in." Or, alternately, the Sp. word is from a pre-Roman Iberian language word represented by Basque zilo, zulo "dugout, cave or shelter for keeping grain." Meaning "underground housing and launch tube for a guided missile"
is attested from 1958.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

silo definition


The FIFO input-character buffer in an EIA-232 serial line card. So called from DEC terminology used on DH and DZ line cards for the VAX and PDP-11, presumably because it was a storage space for fungible stuff that went in at the top and came out at the bottom.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

silo

in agriculture, airtight structure that encloses and protects silage (q.v.; partially fermented fodder, called haylage if made from grass), keeping it in the succulent and slightly sour condition edible for farm animals.

Learn more about silo with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Their loyalty to their silo frequently blinded them to the wider interests of
  the company as a whole.
There have been untold deaths from grain silo explosions over the past hundreds
  or perhaps thousands of years.
Too many companies have a silo approach to products and services.
And you definitely can't use them to see inside a nuclear bunker or silo.
Image for silo
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature