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silver jubilee

noun
1.
See under jubilee (def 1).

jubilee

[joo-buh-lee, joo-buh-lee] /ˈdʒu bəˌli, ˌdʒu bəˈli/
noun
1.
the celebration of any of certain anniversaries, as the twenty-fifth (silver jubilee) fiftieth (golden jubilee) or sixtieth or seventy-fifth (diamond jubilee)
2.
the completion of 50 years of existence, activity, or the like, or its celebration:
Our college will celebrate its jubilee next year.
3.
any season or occasion of rejoicing or festivity.
4.
rejoicing or jubilation.
5.
Roman Catholic Church.
  1. an appointed year or other period, ordinarily every 25 years (ordinary jubilee) in which a plenary indulgence is granted upon repentance and the performance of certain religious acts.
  2. a period of time (extraordinary jubilee) declared by the pope as a time of rejoicing, as for an anniversary, when a plenary indulgence is granted upon repentance and the performance of certain religious acts.
  3. Also called jubilee indulgence. the plenary indulgence granted during such a period.
6.
Also, Jubile. Chiefly Biblical. a yearlong period to be observed by Jews once every 50 years, during which Jewish slaves were to be freed, alienated lands were to be restored to the original owner or an heir, the fields were to be left untilled, and all agricultural labors were to be suspended. Lev. 25.
Compare sabbatical year (def 2).
7.
a black American folk song concerned with future happiness or deliverance from tribulation.
adjective
8.
flambé (def 1):
cherries jubilee for dessert.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English < Middle French jubile < Late Latin < jūbilaeus < Late Greek iōbēlaîos (with ō and ē > u and i by assimilation to Latin jūbilāre to shout for joy) < Hebrew yōbhēl ram's horn, jubilee
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for silver jubilee

jubilee

/ˈdʒuːbɪˌliː; ˌdʒuːbɪˈliː/
noun
1.
a time or season for rejoicing
2.
a special anniversary, esp a 25th or 50th one
3.
(RC Church) a specially appointed period, now ordinarily every 25th year, in which special indulgences are granted
4.
(Old Testament) a year that was to be observed every 50th year, during which Hebrew slaves were to be liberated, alienated property was to be restored, etc
5.
a less common word for jubilation
Word Origin
C14: from Old French jubile, from Late Latin jubilaeus, from Late Greek iōbēlaios, from Hebrew yōbhēl ram's horn, used for the proclamation of the year of jubilee; influenced by Latin jūbilāre to shout for joy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for silver jubilee

jubilee

n.

late 14c., in the Old Testament sense, from Old French jubileu "jubille; anniversary; rejoicing," from Late Latin jubilaeus "the jubilee year," originally an adjective, "of the jubilee," altered (by association with Latin jubilare "to shout with joy") from Greek iabelaios, from iobelos, from Hebrew yobhel "jubilee," formerly "a trumpet, ram's horn," literally "ram."

The original notion was of a year of emancipation of slaves and restoration of lands, to be celebrated every 50th year (Levit. xxv:9); it was proclaimed by the sounding of a ram's horn on the Day of Atonement. The Catholic Church sense of "a period for remission of sin penalties in exchange for pilgrimages, alms, etc." was begun in 1300 by Boniface VIII. The general sense of "season of rejoicing" is first recorded mid-15c., though through early 20c. the word kept its specific association with 50th anniversaries. As a type of African-American folk song, it is attested from 1872.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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silver jubilee in the Bible

a joyful shout or clangour of trumpets, the name of the great semi-centennial festival of the Hebrews. It lasted for a year. During this year the land was to be fallow, and the Israelites were only permitted to gather the spontaneous produce of the fields (Lev. 25:11, 12). All landed property during that year reverted to its original owner (13-34; 27:16-24), and all who were slaves were set free (25:39-54), and all debts were remitted. The return of the jubilee year was proclaimed by a blast of trumpets which sounded throughout the land. There is no record in Scripture of the actual observance of this festival, but there are numerous allusions (Isa. 5:7, 8, 9, 10; 61:1, 2; Ezek. 7:12, 13; Neh. 5:1-19; 2 Chr. 36:21) which place it beyond a doubt that it was observed. The advantages of this institution were manifold. "1. It would prevent the accumulation of land on the part of a few to the detriment of the community at large. 2. It would render it impossible for any one to be born to absolute poverty, since every one had his hereditary land. 3. It would preclude those inequalities which are produced by extremes of riches and poverty, and which make one man domineer over another. 4. It would utterly do away with slavery. 5. It would afford a fresh opportunity to those who were reduced by adverse circumstances to begin again their career of industry in the patrimony which they had temporarily forfeited. 6. It would periodically rectify the disorders which crept into the state in the course of time, preclude the division of the people into nobles and plebeians, and preserve the theocracy inviolate."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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