simplicity

[sim-plis-i-tee]
noun, plural simplicities.
1.
the state, quality, or an instance of being simple.
2.
freedom from complexity, intricacy, or division into parts: an organism of great simplicity.
3.
absence of luxury, pretentiousness, ornament, etc.; plainness: a life of simplicity.
4.
freedom from deceit or guile; sincerity; artlessness; naturalness: a simplicity of manner.
5.
lack of mental acuteness or shrewdness: Politics is not a field for simplicity about human nature.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English simplicite (< Old French simplicité) < Latin simplicitās simpleness, equivalent to simplici- (stem of simplex) simplex + -tās -ty2

nonsimplicity, noun, plural nonsimplicities.
oversimplicity, noun
supersimplicity, noun


4. candor, directness, honesty.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
simplicity (sɪmˈplɪsɪtɪ)
 
n
the quality or condition of being simple

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

simplicity
late 14c., from O.Fr. simplicite (Fr. simplicité), from L. simplicitatem (nom. simplicitas) "state of being simple," from simplex (gen. simplicis) "simple" (see simplex). Sense of "ignorance" is from 1510s, that of "plainness" is from 1520s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But such simplicity belies a truth about the restaurant's cooking.
In offering online estimators, admissions and financial-aid offices weigh
  accuracy vs simplicity.
The best way to fight tax avoidance, then, is with simplicity.
Brace yourself to a realization of its obviousness and simplicity.
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