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7 Essential Words of Fall

Falstaff

[fawl-staf, -stahf] /ˈfɔl stæf, -stɑf/
noun
1.
Sir John, the jovial, fat knight of brazen assurance and few scruples in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, and The Merry Wives of Windsor.
2.
(italics) an opera (1893) by Giuseppe Verdi, with a libretto by Arrigo Boito based on the Shakespearean character.

Franklin

[frangk-lin] /ˈfræŋk lɪn/
noun
1.
Aretha [uh-ree-thuh] /əˈri θə/ (Show IPA), born 1942, U.S. singer.
2.
Benjamin, 1706–90, American statesman, diplomat, author, scientist, and inventor.
3.
Sir John, 1786–1847, English Arctic explorer.
4.
John Hope, 1915–2009, U.S. historian and educator.
5.
a district in extreme N Canada, in the Northwest Territories, including the Boothia and Melville peninsulas, Baffin Island, and other Arctic islands. 549,253 sq. mi. (1,422,565 sq. km).
6.
a town in S Massachusetts.
7.
a city in SE Wisconsin.
8.
a town in central Tennessee.
9.
a town in central Indiana.
10.
a town in SW Ohio.
11.
a male given name: from a Germanic word meaning “freeholder.”.

Gielgud

[gil-goo d, geel-] /ˈgɪl gʊd, ˈgil-/
noun
1.
Sir (Arthur) John, 1904–2000, English actor and director.

Hawkins

[haw-kinz] /ˈhɔ kɪnz/
noun
1.
Sir Anthony Hope ("Anthony Hope") 1863–1933, English novelist and playwright.
2.
Coleman, 1904–69, U.S. jazz saxophonist.
3.
Also, Hawkyns. Sir John, 1532–95, English slave trader and rear admiral.

Hawkyns

[haw-kinz] /ˈhɔ kɪnz/
noun
1.
Sir John, Hawkins, Sir John.

Lubbock

[luhb-uh k] /ˈlʌb ək/
noun
1.
Sir John, 1st Baron Avebury, 1834–1913, English author, natural scientist, and statesman.
2.
a city in NW Texas.

Mandeville

[man-duh-vil] /ˈmæn dəˌvɪl/
noun
1.
Bernard de
[duh] /də/ (Show IPA),
c1670–1733, English physician and satirist, born in Holland.
2.
Sir John, died 1372, English compiler of a book of travels.

Moore

[moo r, mawr, mohr] /mʊər, mɔr, moʊr/
noun
1.
Archibald Lee ("Archie") 1913–1998, U.S. boxer.
2.
Brian, 1921–1999, U.S. novelist.
3.
Clement Clarke, 1779–1863, U.S. scholar and writer.
4.
Douglas Stuart, 1893–1969, U.S. composer.
5.
Eliakim Hastings
[ih-lahy-uh-kim] /ɪˈlaɪ ə kɪm/ (Show IPA),
1862–1932, U.S. mathematician.
6.
George, 1852–1933, Irish novelist, critic, and dramatist.
7.
G(eorge) E(dward) 1873–1958, English philosopher.
8.
Gerald, 1899–1987, British pianist.
9.
Henry, 1898–1986, English sculptor.
10.
Sir John, 1761–1809, British general.
11.
John Bassett
[bas-it,, -et] /ˈbæs ɪt,, -ɛt/ (Show IPA),
1860–1947, U.S. jurist.
12.
Marianne (Craig) 1887–1972, U.S. poet and critic.
13.
Stanford, 1913–82, U.S. biochemist: Nobel Prize in chemistry 1972.
14.
Thomas, 1779–1852, Irish poet.
15.
a city in central Oklahoma.

Oldcastle

[ohld-kas-uh l, -kah-suh l] /ˈoʊldˌkæs əl, -ˌkɑ səl/
noun
1.
Sir John (Lord Cobham) 1377–1417, English martyr: leader of a Lollard conspiracy; executed for treason and heresy; model for Shakespeare's Falstaff.

Ross

[raws, ros] /rɔs, rɒs/
noun
1.
Betsy Griscom
[gris-kuh m] /ˈgrɪs kəm/ (Show IPA),
1752–1836, maker of the first U.S. flag.
2.
Harold Wallace, 1892–1951, U.S. publisher and editor.
3.
Sir James Clark, 1800–62, English navigator: explorer of the Arctic and the Antarctic.
4.
his uncle, Sir John, 1777–1856, Scottish naval officer and arctic explorer.
5.
John (CoowescooweorKooweskoowe) 1790–1866, Cherokee leader.
6.
Nellie Tayloe [tey-loh] /ˈteɪ loʊ/ (Show IPA), 1876–1977, U.S. politician and governor of Wyoming: first woman U.S. governor 1925–27.
7.
Sir Ronald, 1857–1932, English physician: Nobel prize 1902.
8.
a male given name.

Simon

[sahy-muh n; French see-mawn for 7] /ˈsaɪ mən; French siˈmɔ̃ for 7/
noun
1.
the original name of the apostle Peter.
Compare Peter.
2.
Simon the Zealot, one of the twelve apostles. Matt. 10:4.
3.
the Canaanite, one of the twelve apostles. Matt. 10:4; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15.
4.
a relative, perhaps a brother, of Jesus: sometimes identified with Simon the Canaanite. Matt. 13:55; Mark 6:3.
5.
(“Simon Magus”) the Samaritan sorcerer who was converted by the apostle Philip. Acts 8:9–24.
6.
(“Simon Magus”) fl. 2nd century a.d. ?, founder of a Gnostic sect and reputed prototype of the Faust legend: often identified with the Biblical Simon Magus.
7.
Claude [klohd] /kloʊd/ (Show IPA), 1913–2005, French novelist, born in Madagascar: Nobel prize 1985.
8.
Herbert Alexander, 1916–2001, U.S. social scientist and economist: Nobel prize 1978.
9.
Sir John (Allsebrook)
[awlz-broo k] /ˈɔlzˌbrʊk/ (Show IPA),
1873–1954, British statesman and lawyer.
10.
Neil, born 1927, U.S. playwright.
11.
Paul, born 1942, U.S. singer and songwriter.
12.
a male given name, form of Simeon.

Soane

[sohn] /soʊn/
noun
1.
Sir John, 1753–1837, English architect.

Suckling

[suhk-ling] /ˈsʌk lɪŋ/
noun
1.
Sir John, 1609–42, English poet.

Tenniel

[ten-yuh l] /ˈtɛn yəl/
noun
1.
Sir John, 1820–1914, English caricaturist and illustrator.

Barbirolli

[bahr-buh-roh-lee, -rol-ee] /ˌbɑr bəˈroʊ li, -ˈrɒl i/
noun
1.
Sir John, 1899–1970, English conductor.

Betjeman

[bech-uh-muh n] /ˈbɛtʃ ə mən/
noun
1.
Sir John, 1906–84, English poet: poet laureate 1972–84.

Campbell

[kam-buh l, kam-uh l] /ˈkæm bəl, ˈkæm əl/
noun
1.
Alexander, 1788–1866, U.S. religious leader, born in Ireland: cofounder with his father, Thomas, of the Disciples of Christ Church.
2.
Avril Phaedra [av-ril] /ˈæv rɪl/ (Show IPA), (Kim) born 1947, Canadian politician: first woman prime minister 1993.
3.
Colen
[kol-uh n,, koh-luh n] /ˈkɒl ən,, ˈkoʊ lən/ (Show IPA),
or Colin, died 1729, Scottish architect and author.
4.
Colin (Baron Clyde) 1792–1863, Scottish general.
5.
Sir John, 1779–1861, English jurist and writer: Lord Chancellor of England 1859–61.
6.
Joseph, 1904–87, U.S. mythologist.
7.
Sir Malcolm, 1885–1948, English automobile and speedboat racer.
8.
Mrs. Patrick (Beatrice Stella Tanner) 1865–1940, English actress.
9.
Thomas, 1763–1854, Irish religious leader, in the U.S. after 1807: cofounder with his son, Alexander, of the Disciples of Christ Church.
10.
Thomas, 1777–1844, Scottish poet and editor.
11.
a city in W California.
12.
a city in NE Ohio.

Cobham

[kob-uh m] /ˈkɒb əm/
noun
1.
Sir John, Oldcastle, Sir John.

Denham

[den-uh m] /ˈdɛn əm/
noun
1.
Sir John, 1615–69, English poet and architect.

Eliot

[el-ee-uh t, el-yuh t] /ˈɛl i ət, ˈɛl yət/
noun
1.
Charles William, 1834–1926, U.S. educator: president of Harvard University 1869–1909.
2.
George (Mary Ann Evans) 1819–80, English novelist.
3.
John ("the Apostle of the Indians") 1604–90, American colonial missionary.
4.
Sir John, 1592–1632, English statesman.
5.
T(homas) S(tearns)
[sturnz] /stɜrnz/ (Show IPA),
1888–1965, British poet and critic, born in the U.S.: Nobel Prize 1948.
6.
a male given name, form of Elias.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for sir john

Barbirolli

/ˌbɑːbəˈrɒlɪ/
noun
1.
Sir John. 1899–1970, English conductor of the Hallé Orchestra (1943–68)

Betjeman

/ˈbɛtʃəmən/
noun
1.
Sir John. 1906–84, English poet, noted for his nostalgic and humorous verse and essays and for his concern for the preservation of historic buildings, esp of the Victorian era. Poet laureate (1972–84)

Campbell

/ˈkæmbəl/
noun
1.
Sir Colin, Baron Clyde. 1792–1863, British field marshal who relieved Lucknow for the second time (1857) and commanded in Oudh, suppressing the Indian Mutiny
2.
Donald. 1921–67, English water speed record-holder
3.
Sir Malcolm, father of Donald Campbell. 1885–1948, English racing driver and land speed record-holder
4.
Mrs Patrick, original name Beatrice Stella Tanner. 1865–1940, English actress
5.
Roy. 1901–57, South African poet. His poetry is often satirical and includes The Flaming Terrapin (1924)
6.
Thomas. 1777–1844, Scottish poet and critic, noted particularly for his war poems Hohenlinden and Ye Mariners of England

Cobham

/ˈkɒbəm/
noun
1.
Lord Cobham, title of Sir John Oldcastle See Oldcastle

Eliot

/ˈɛlɪət/
noun
1.
George, real name Mary Ann Evans. 1819–80, English novelist, noted for her analysis of provincial Victorian society. Her best-known novels include Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), and Middlemarch (1872)
2.
Sir John. 1592–1632, English statesman, a leader of parliamentary opposition to Charles I
3.
T(homas) S(tearns). 1888–1965, British poet, dramatist, and critic, born in the US His poetry includes Prufrock and Other Observations (1917), The Waste Land (1922), Ash Wednesday (1930), and Four Quartets (1943). Among his verse plays are Murder in the Cathedral (1935), The Family Reunion (1939), The Cocktail Party (1950), and The Confidential Clerk (1954): Nobel prize for literature 1948

franklin

/ˈfræŋklɪn/
noun
1.
(in 14th- and 15th-century England) a substantial landholder of free but not noble birth
Word Origin
C13: from Anglo-French fraunclein, from Old French franc free, on the model of chamberlain

Franklin

/ˈfræŋklɪn/
noun
1.
Aretha (əˈriːθə) born 1942, US soul, pop, and gospel singer; noted for her songs "Respect" (1967), "I Say a Little Prayer" (1968), and, with George Michael, "I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)" (1987)
2.
Benjamin 1706–90, American statesman, scientist, and author. He helped draw up the Declaration of Independence (1776) and, as ambassador to France (1776–85), he negotiated an alliance with France and a peace settlement with Britain. As a scientist, he is noted particularly for his researches in electricity, esp his invention of the lightning conductor
3.
Sir John. 1786–1847, English explorer of the Arctic: lieutenant-governor of Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania) (1836–43): died while on a voyage to discover the Northwest Passage
4.
Rosalind. 1920–58, British x-ray crystallographer. She contributed to the discovery of the structure of DNA, before her premature death from cancer

Gielgud

/ˈɡiːlɡʊd/
noun
1.
Sir John. 1904–2000, English stage, film, and television actor and director

Hawkins

/ˈhɔːkɪnz/
noun
1.
Coleman. 1904–69, US pioneer of the tenor saxophone for jazz
2.
Sir John. 1532–95, English naval commander and slave trader, treasurer of the navy (1577–89); commander of a squadron in the fleet that defeated the Spanish Armada (1588)

Lubbock

/ˈlʌbək/
noun
1.
a city in NW Texas: cotton market. Pop: 206 481 (2003 est)

Mandeville

/ˈmændəvɪl/
noun
1.
Bernard de. ?1670–1733, English author, born in Holland, noted for his satire The Fable of the Bees (1723)
2.
Sir John. 14th century, English author of The Travels of Sir John Mandeville. The book claims to be an account of the author's journeys in the East but is largely a compilation from other works

Moore1

/mʊə; mɔː/
noun
1.
Bobby. full name Robert Frederick Moore. 1941–93, British footballer captain of the England team that won the World Cup in 1966
2.
Dudley (Stuart John). 1935–2002, British actor, comedian, and musician noted for his comedy partnership (1960–73) with Peter Cook and such films as 10 (1979) and Arthur (1981)
3.
George. 1852–1933, Irish novelist. His works include Esther Waters (1894) and The Brook Kerith (1916)
4.
G(eorge) E(dward). 1873–1958, British philosopher, noted esp for his Principia Ethica (1903)
5.
Gerald. 1899–1987, British pianist, noted as an accompanist esp to lieder singers
6.
Henry. 1898–1986, British sculptor. His works are characterized by monumental organic forms and include the Madonna and Child (1943) at St Matthew's Church, Northampton
7.
Sir John. 1761–1809, British general; commander of the British army (1808–09) in the Peninsular War: killed at Corunna
8.
Marianne (Craig). 1887–1972, US poet: her works include Observations (1924) and Selected Poems (1935)
9.
Thomas. 1779–1852, Irish poet, best known for Irish Melodies (1807–34)

Moore2

/ˈmʊʊre/
noun
1.
another name for Mossi

Oldcastle

/ˈəʊldˌkɑːsəl/
noun
1.
Sir John, Baron Cobham. ?1378–1417, Lollard leader. In 1411 he led an English army in France but in 1413 he was condemned as a heretic and later hanged and burnt. He is thought to have been a model for Shakespeare's character Falstaff in Henry IV

Ross

/rɒs/
noun
1.
Diana. born 1944, US singer: lead vocalist (1961–69) with Motown group the Supremes, whose hits include "Baby Love" (1964). Her subsequent recordings include Lady Sings the Blues (film soundtrack, 1972), and Chain Reaction (1986)
2.
Sir James Clark. 1800–62, British naval officer; explorer of the Arctic and Antarctic. He located the north magnetic pole (1831) and discovered the Ross Sea during an Antarctic voyage (1839–43)
3.
his uncle, Sir John. 1777–1856, Scottish naval officer and Arctic explorer
4.
Sir Ronald. 1857–1932, English bacteriologist, who discovered the transmission of malaria by mosquitoes: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1902

Simon

/ˈsaɪmən/
noun
1.
the original name of (Saint) Peter (sense 1)
2.
(New Testament)
  1. See Simon Zelotes
  2. Also Simon the Tanner. a relative of Jesus, who may have been identical with Simon Zelotes (Matthew 13:55)
  3. Also Simon the Tanner. a Christian of Joppa with whom Peter stayed (Acts of the Apostles 9:43)
3.
John (Allsebrook), 1st Viscount Simon. 1873–1954, British statesman and lawyer. He was Liberal home secretary (1915–16) and, as a leader of the National Liberals, foreign secretary (1931–35), home secretary (1935–37), Chancellor of the Exchequer (1937–40), Lord Chancellor (1940–45)
4.
(Marvin) Neil. born 1927, US dramatist and librettist, whose plays include Barefoot in the Park (1963), California Suite (1976), Biloxi Blues (1985), Lost in Yonkers (1990), and London Suite (1995): many have been made into films
5.
Paul. born 1941, US pop singer and songwriter. His albums include: with Art Garfunkel (born 1941), The Sounds of Silence (1966), and Bridge over Troubled Water (1970); and, solo, Graceland (1986), The Rhythm of the Saints (1990), and You're The One (2000)

Soane

/səʊn/
noun
1.
Sir John. 1753–1837, British architect. His work includes Dulwich College Art Gallery (1811–14) and his own house in Lincoln's Inn Fields, London (1812–13), which is now the Sir John Soane's Museum

suckling

/ˈsʌklɪŋ/
noun
1.
an infant or young animal that is still taking milk from the mother
2.
a very young child
Word Origin
C15: see suck, -ling1; related to Middle Dutch sūgeling, Middle High German sōgelinc

Suckling

/ˈsʌklɪŋ/
noun
1.
Sir John. 1609–42, English Cavalier poet and dramatist

Tenniel

/ˈtɛnjəl/
noun
1.
Sir John. 1820–1914, English caricaturist, noted for his illustrations to Lewis Carroll's Alice books and for his political cartoons in Punch (1851–1901)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sir john

Campbell

family name, from Gaelic caimbeul "wry or crooked mouth," from cam "crooked, deformed, one-eyed, cross-eyed." Also in surname Cameron, from Gaelic camshron "wry or hooked nose" (in the Highland clan; the Lowland name is for a locality in Fife). The Campbell Soup Company was started in 1869 by Joseph A. Campbell; Warhol began painting their cans in 1962.

Eliot

surname, Old French diminutive of Elias (French Elie; see Elijah) + -ot. It absorbed the Anglo-Saxon proper names Æðelgeat and Ælfweald "Elf-ruler."

Franklin

surname attested from late 12c., Middle English Frankeleyn, from Anglo-French fraunclein "a land-owner of free but not noble birth," from Old French franc "free" (see frank (adj.)), with Germanic suffix also found in chamberlain.

The Franklin stove (1787) so called because it was invented by U.S. scientist/politician Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790). In early 19c., lightning rods often were called Franklins.

Simon

masc. proper name, from Latin, from Greek Symeon, from Hebrew Shim'on, literally "hearkening, hearing," from shama "he heard." In English Old Testaments, usually printed as Simeon, but in New Testament almost always as Simon. Confused with Greek masc. proper name Simon, which is from simos "snub-nosed."

suckling

n.

mid-15c., "an infant at the breast," from suck + diminutive suffix -ling. Cf. Middle Dutch sogeling, Dutch zuigeling, German Säugling. Meaning "act of breast-feeding" is attested from 1799.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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sir john in Medicine

Franklin Frank·lin (frāngk'lĭn), Rosalind. 1920-1958.

British biophysicist. Her x-ray diffraction studies of DNA led to the description of the full structure of DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick.

Moore (mur, môr), Stanford. 1913-1982.

American biochemist. He shared a 1972 Nobel Prize for pioneering studies of the enzyme ribonuclease.

Ross (rôs), Sir Ronald. 1857-1932.

British physician. He won a 1902 Nobel Prize for proving that malaria is transmitted to humans by the bite of the mosquito.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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sir john in Science
Franklin
  (frāngk'lĭn)   
American public official, scientist, inventor, and writer who fully established the distinction between negative and positive electricity, proved that lightning and electricity are identical, and suggested that buildings could be protected by lightning conductors. He also invented bifocal glasses, established the direction of the prevailing storm track in North America and determined the existence of the Gulf Stream.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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sir john in Culture

Falstaff definition


An endearing, fat, aging rogue who appears in several of the plays of William Shakespeare. He is prominent in the two parts of King Henry the Fourth, where he is the jolly companion of Prince Hal, the future King Henry V. Falstaff is a lover of wine, women, and song; although a coward in practice, he loves to tell tales of his supposed bravery.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for sir john

Franklin

noun

A hundred-dollar bill; c-note: He peels off another five Franklins

[1990s+; fr its portrait of Benjamin Franklin]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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sir john in the Bible

the abbreviated form of Simeon. (1.) One of the twelve apostles, called the Canaanite (Matt. 10:4; Mark 3:18). This word "Canaanite" does not mean a native of Canaan, but is derived from the Syriac word Kanean or Kaneniah, which was the name of a Jewish sect. The Revised Version has "Cananaean;" marg., "or Zealot" He is also called "Zelotes" (Luke 6:15; Acts 1:13; R.V., "the Zealot"), because previous to his call to the apostleship he had been a member of the fanatical sect of the Zealots. There is no record regarding him. (2.) The father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71; 13:2, 26). (3.) One of the brothers of our Lord (Matt. 13:55; Mark 6:3). (4.) A Pharisee in whose house "a woman of the city which was a sinner" anointed our Lord's feet with ointment (Luke 7:36-38). (5.) A leper of Bethany, in whose house Mary anointed our Lord's head with ointment "as he sat at meat" (Matt. 26:6-13; Mark 14:3-9). (6.) A Jew of Cyrene, in North Africa, then a province of Libya. A hundred thousand Jews from Palestine had been settled in this province by Ptolemy Soter (B.C. 323-285), where by this time they had greatly increased in number. They had a synagogue in Jerusalem for such of their number as went thither to the annual feasts. Simon was seized by the soldiers as the procession wended its way to the place of crucifixion as he was passing by, and the heavy cross which Christ from failing strength could no longer bear was laid on his shoulders. Perhaps they seized him because he showed sympathy with Jesus. He was the "father of Alexander and Rufus" (Matt. 27:32). Possibly this Simon may have been one of the "men of Cyrene" who preached the word to the Greeks (Acts 11:20). (7.) A sorcerer of great repute for his magical arts among the Samaritans (Acts 8:9-11). He afterwards became a professed convert to the faith under the preaching of Philip the deacon and evangelist (12, 13). His profession was, however, soon found to be hollow. His conduct called forth from Peter a stern rebuke (8:18-23). From this moment he disappears from the Church's history. The term "Simony," as denoting the purchase for money of spiritual offices, is derived from him. (8.) A Christian at Joppa, a tanner by trade, with whom Peter on one occasion lodged (Acts 9:43). (9.) Simon Peter (Matt. 4:18). See PETER.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Article for sir john

Mandeville

town, west-central Jamaica, west of Kingston. It is a mountain resort 2,061 feet (628 metres) above sea level. Surrounded by stone-walled pastures, the old centre of Mandeville has the atmosphere of an English village. Nearby is a large bauxite mine, which provides much of the town's employment and prosperity. Mandeville is also a favourite location for Jamaicans who have returned from working abroad to retire. Its name was derived from the courtesy title (Viscount Mandeville) of William Montagu, duke of Manchester, who was governor of Jamaica from 1808 until 1827. Pop. (1991) urban area, 39,430.

Learn more about Mandeville with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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3
3
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