situationally

situation

[sich-oo-ey-shuhn]
noun
1.
manner of being situated; location or position with reference to environment: The situation of the house allowed for a beautiful view.
2.
a place or locality.
3.
condition; case; plight: He is in a desperate situation.
4.
the state of affairs; combination of circumstances: The present international situation is dangerous.
5.
a position or post of employment; job.
6.
a state of affairs of special or critical significance in the course of a play, novel, etc.
7.
Sociology. the aggregate of biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors acting on an individual or group to condition behavioral patterns.

Origin:
1480–90; < Medieval Latin situātiōn- (stem of situātiō). See situate, -ion

situational, adjective
situationally, adverb


1. site. 4. See state. 5. See position.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
situation (ˌsɪtjʊˈeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  physical placement, esp with regard to the surroundings
2.  a.  state of affairs; combination of circumstances
 b.  a complex or critical state of affairs in a novel, play, etc
3.  social or financial status, position, or circumstances
4.  a position of employment; post
 
usage  Situation is often used in contexts in which it is redundant or imprecise. Typical examples are: the company is in a crisis situation or people in a job situation. In the first example, situation does not add to the meaning and should be omitted. In the second example, it would be clearer and more concise to substitute a phrase such as people at work
 
situ'ational
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

situation
late 15c., "place, position, or location," from M.L. situationem (nom. situatio), from L.L. situatus, pp. of situare (see situate). Meaning "state of affairs" is from 1750; meaning "employment post" is from 1803. Situation ethics first attested 1955.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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