situation

[sich-oo-ey-shuhn]
noun
1.
manner of being situated; location or position with reference to environment: The situation of the house allowed for a beautiful view.
2.
a place or locality.
3.
condition; case; plight: He is in a desperate situation.
4.
the state of affairs; combination of circumstances: The present international situation is dangerous.
5.
a position or post of employment; job.
6.
a state of affairs of special or critical significance in the course of a play, novel, etc.
7.
Sociology. the aggregate of biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors acting on an individual or group to condition behavioral patterns.

Origin:
1480–90; < Medieval Latin situātiōn- (stem of situātiō). See situate, -ion

situational, adjective
situationally, adverb


1. site. 4. See state. 5. See position.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
situation (ˌsɪtjʊˈeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  physical placement, esp with regard to the surroundings
2.  a.  state of affairs; combination of circumstances
 b.  a complex or critical state of affairs in a novel, play, etc
3.  social or financial status, position, or circumstances
4.  a position of employment; post
 
usage  Situation is often used in contexts in which it is redundant or imprecise. Typical examples are: the company is in a crisis situation or people in a job situation. In the first example, situation does not add to the meaning and should be omitted. In the second example, it would be clearer and more concise to substitute a phrase such as people at work
 
situ'ational
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

situation
late 15c., "place, position, or location," from M.L. situationem (nom. situatio), from L.L. situatus, pp. of situare (see situate). Meaning "state of affairs" is from 1750; meaning "employment post" is from 1803. Situation ethics first attested 1955.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Where hardy, all are valued for ease of maintenance in difficult situations and
  for handsome, glossy foliage.
Let's use the example of a fruit tree in the ground, but you can easily adapt
  this to other situations.
To tailor your hose to various water situations, you can choose from these
  attachments.
Studies show that coaches often make poor choices in crucial situations.
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