follow Dictionary.com

Do you know ghouls from goblins and ghosts?

slope

[slohp] /sloʊp/
verb (used without object), sloped, sloping.
1.
to have or take an inclined or oblique direction or angle considered with reference to a vertical or horizontal plane; slant.
2.
to move at an inclination or obliquely:
They sloped gradually westward.
verb (used with object), sloped, sloping.
3.
to direct at a slant or inclination; incline from the horizontal or vertical:
The sun sloped its beams.
4.
to form with a slope or slant:
to slope an embankment.
noun
5.
ground that has a natural incline, as the side of a hill.
6.
inclination or slant, especially downward or upward.
7.
deviation from the horizontal or vertical.
8.
an inclined surface.
9.
Usually, slopes. hills, especially foothills or bluffs:
the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro.
10.
Mathematics.
  1. the tangent of the angle between a given straight line and the x- axis of a system of Cartesian coordinates.
  2. the derivative of the function whose graph is a given curve evaluated at a designated point.
11.
Slang: Disparaging and Offensive. an Asian, especially a Vietnamese.
Idioms
12.
slope off, Chiefly British Slang. to make one's way out slowly or furtively.
Origin
1495-1505
1495-1505; aphetic variant of aslope; akin to slip1
Related forms
slopingly, adverb
slopingness, noun
unsloped, adjective
unsloping, adjective
Synonyms
1. Slope, slant mean to incline away from a relatively straight surface or line used as a reference. To slope is to incline vertically in an oblique direction: The ground slopes (upward or downward ) sharply here. To slant is to fall to one side, to lie obliquely to some line whether horizontal or perpendicular: The road slants off to the right.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for sloped
  • Were you to graph these figures, you'd get a curve that sloped sharply at first, then tapered off.
  • Horseshoe crabs were misnamed centuries ago, when mariners thought the odd creatures' sloped shells resembled horse's feet.
  • However, since the avenue sloped up and down some hills, it wouldn't have been able to hold water.
  • Toward heaven's descent had sloped his westering wheel.
  • The floors also sloped, apparently deliberately-probably to make moving grain around them easier.
  • While the rest of the band sloped off to get stoned, he did his business-studies homework and wrote up their tax returns.
  • Tall letters looked simple, but when one leaned all the rest sloped off towards disaster.
  • sloped entries must have handrails on both sides regardless of the slope.
  • For the depth below grade, enter the average of the depth across the sloped line.
  • Inception point relationship for flat-sloped stepped spillways.
British Dictionary definitions for sloped

slope

/sləʊp/
verb
1.
to lie or cause to lie at a slanting or oblique angle
2.
(intransitive) (esp of natural features) to follow an inclined course: many paths sloped down the hillside
3.
(intransitive; foll by off, away, etc) to go furtively
4.
(transitive) (military) (formerly) to hold (a rifle) in the slope position (esp in the command slope arms)
noun
5.
an inclined portion of ground
6.
(pl) hills or foothills
7.
any inclined surface or line
8.
the degree or amount of such inclination
9.
(maths)
  1. (of a line) the tangent of the angle between the line and another line parallel to the x-axis
  2. the first derivative of the equation of a curve at a given point
10.
(formerly) the position adopted for British military drill when the rifle is rested on the shoulder
11.
(US, slang, derogatory) a person from Southeast Asia, especially a Vietnamese
Derived Forms
sloper, noun
sloping, adjective
slopingly, adverb
slopingness, noun
Word Origin
C15: short for aslope, perhaps from the past participle of Old English āslūpan to slip away, from slūpan to slip
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for sloped

slope

v.

1590s, "go in an oblique direction," from earlier adjective meaning "slanting" (c.1500), probably from Middle English aslope (adv.) "on the incline" (late 15c.), from Old English *aslopen, past participle of aslupan "to slip away," from a- "away" + slupan "to slip" (see sleeve). From 1709 as "to be in a slanting position;" transitive sense "place in a slanting position" is from c.1600. Related: Sloped; sloping.

n.

1610s, "inclination," from slope (v.). Meaning "an incline, a slant (of ground)" is from 1620s. Derogatory slang meaning "Oriental person" is attested from 1948.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Slang definitions & phrases for sloped

slope 1

verb
  1. (also slope out) To run away; depart; lam, skedaddle (1830+)
  2. To escape from jail (1940s+ Underworld & hoboes)

[perhaps fr Dutch sloop, ''sneaked away'']


slope 2

noun

An Asian; dink, gook

[Vietnam War armed forces; fr the apparent slanting of eyes caused by the typical epicanthic fold of Asian peoples]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for slope

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for sloped

9
11
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for sloped