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smuggle

[smuhg-uh l] /ˈsmʌg əl/
verb (used with object), smuggled, smuggling.
1.
to import or export (goods) secretly, in violation of the law, especially without payment of legal duty.
2.
to bring, take, put, etc., surreptitiously:
She smuggled the gun into the jail inside a cake.
verb (used without object), smuggled, smuggling.
3.
to import, export, or convey goods surreptitiously or in violation of the law.
Origin of smuggle
1680-1690
1680-90; < Low German smuggeln; cognate with German schmuggeln
Related forms
smuggler, noun
antismuggling, adjective
unsmuggled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for smuggling
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • James Stansfield was, in fact, the organizer of the smuggling business carried on at Poole, and the adjacent harbours.

    No Surrender! G. A. Henty
  • This signal was soon answered, and then it was look out for the smuggling boats!

    Ned Myers James Fenimore Cooper
  • I am afraid the other Tom is rather suspected of smuggling; but then what a temptation.

  • It was said that he had made a good deal of money by smuggling goods into the States.

    The Hunted Outlaw Anonymous
  • The buccaneers and smuggling traders were especially active in the latter part of the seventeenth century.

British Dictionary definitions for smuggling

smuggle

/ˈsmʌɡəl/
verb
1.
to import or export (prohibited or dutiable goods) secretly
2.
(transitive; often foll by into or out of) to bring or take secretly, as against the law or rules
3.
(transitive) foll by away. to conceal; hide
Derived Forms
smuggler, noun
smuggling, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Low German smukkelen and Dutch smokkelen, perhaps from Old English smūgen to creep; related to Old Norse smjūga
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for smuggling

smuggle

v.

"import or export secretly and contrary to law," 1680s, of Low German or Dutch origin (see smuggler). Related: Smuggled; smuggling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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14
21
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